Reference > Quotations > S. Austin Allibone, comp. > Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay
  PREVIOUSNEXT  
CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
S. Austin Allibone, comp.  Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay.  1880.
 
Ovid
 
  Ovid ranged over all Parnassus with great nimbleness and agility; but as he did not much care for the toil requisite to climb the upper part of the hill, he was generally roving about the bottom.
Joseph Addison.    
  1
 
  He has none of those little points and puerilities that are so often to be met with in Ovid; none of the epigrammatic turns of Lucan; none of those swelling sentiments which are so frequent in Statius and Claudian; none of those mixed embellishments of Tasso.
Joseph Addison.    
  2
 
  The most severe censor cannot but be pleased with the prodigality of Ovid’s wit; though he could have wished that the master of it had been a better manager.
John Dryden.    
  3
 
  If sometimes Ovid appears too gay, there is a secret gracefulness of youth which accompanies his writings, though the stayedness and sobriety of age be wanting.
John Dryden.    
  4
 
  No man has ever treated the passions of love with so much delicacy of thought and of expression, or searched into the nature of it more philosophically, than Ovid.
John Dryden.    
  5
 
  The turn of words, in which Ovid excels all poets, are sometimes a fault or sometimes a beauty, as they are used properly or improperly.
John Dryden.    
  6
 
 
CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
  PREVIOUSNEXT  
 
Loading
Click here to shop the Bartleby Bookstore.

Shakespeare · Bible · Strunk · Anatomy · Nonfiction · Quotations · Reference · Fiction · Poetry
© 1993–2014 Bartleby.com · [Top 150] · Subjects · Titles · Authors