Reference > Quotations > S. Austin Allibone, comp. > Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay
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S. Austin Allibone, comp.  Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay.  1880.
 
Obstinacy
 
  I believe that obstinacy, or the dread of control and discipline, arises not so much from self-willedness, as from a conscious defect of voluntary power; as foolhardiness is not seldom the disguise of conscious timidity.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge.    
  1
 
  Obstinacy is an affection immovable, fixed to will, abandoning reason, which is engendered of pride: that is to say, when a man esteemeth so much himself above any other that he reputeth his own wit only to be in perfection, and contemneth all other counsel.
Sir Thomas Elyot.    
  2
 
  Obstinacy in opinions holds the dogmatist in the chains of error, without hope of emancipation.
Joseph Glanvill.    
  3
 
  There is something in obstinacy which differs from every other passion. Whenever it fails, it never recovers, but either breaks like iron, or crumbles sulkily away, like a fractured arch. Most other passions have their periods of fatigue and rest, their sufferings and their cure; but obstinacy has no resource, and the first wound is mortal.
Dr. Samuel Johnson.    
  4
 
  Firmness or stiffness of the mind is not from adherence to truth, but submission to prejudice.
John Locke.    
  5
 
  Narrowness of mind is often the cause of obstinacy: we do not easily believe beyond what we see.  6
 
 
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