Reference > Quotations > S. Austin Allibone, comp. > Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay
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S. Austin Allibone, comp.  Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay.  1880.
 
Irreverence
 
  It is a kind of taking God’s name in vain to debase religion with such frivolous disputes.
Richard Hooker.    
  1
 
  To call God to witness truth, or a lie perhaps; or to appeal to him on every trivial occasion, in common discourse, customarily without consideration, is one of the highest indignities and affronts that can be offered him.
John Ray.    
  2
 
  We must take heed how we accustom ourselves to a slight and irreverent use of the name of God, and of the phrases and expressions of the Holy Bible, which ought not to be applied upon every slight occasion.
John Tillotson.    
  3
 
 
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