Reference > Quotations > S. Austin Allibone, comp. > Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay
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S. Austin Allibone, comp.  Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay.  1880.
 
Invention
 
  Invention is a kind of muse, which, being possessed of the other advantages common to her sisters, and being warmed by the fire of Apollo, is raised higher than the rest.
John Dryden.    
  1
 
  Whatever praises may be given to works of judgment, there is not even a single beauty in them to which the invention must not contribute.
Alexander Pope.    
  2
 
  Invention, strictly speaking, is little more than a new combination of those images which have been previously gathered and deposited in the memory. Nothing can be made of nothing: he who has laid up no materials can produce no combinations.
Sir Joshua Reynolds.    
  3
 
  It appears, therefore, that improvements in the arts are properly called inventions.
Dugald Stewart.    
  4
 
 
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