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S. Austin Allibone, comp.  Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay.  1880.
 
Humour
 
  Among all kinds of writing, there is none in which authors are more apt to miscarry than in works of humour, as there is none in which they are more ambitious to excel. It is not an imagination that teems with monsters, a head that is filled with extravagant conceptions, which is capable of furnishing the world with diversions of this nature; and yet if we look into the productions of several writers who set up for men of humour, what wild, irregular fancies, what unnatural distortions of thought do we meet with! If they speak nonsense, they believe they are talking humour; and when they have drawn together a scheme of absurd, inconsistent ideas, they are not able to read it over to themselves without laughing. These poor gentlemen endeavour to gain themselves the reputation of wits and humorists, by such monstrous conceits as almost qualify them for Bedlam; not considering that humour should always lie under the check of reason, and that it requires the direction of the nicest judgment, by so much the more as it indulges itself in the most boundless freedoms. There is a kind of nature that is to be observed in this sort of compositions as well as in all other; and a certain regularity of thought which must discover the writer to be a man of sense, at the same time that he appears altogether given up to caprice.
Joseph Addison: Spectator, No. 35.    
  1
 
  I shall set down at length the genealogical table of False Humour, and, at the same time, place under it the genealogy of True Humour, that the reader may at one view behold their different pedigrees and relations:
        
Falsehood.
Nonsense.
Frenzy.—Laughter.
False Humour.
  
Truth.
Good Sense.
Wit.—Mirth.
Humour.
Joseph Addison: Spectator, No. 35.    
  2
 
  It is impossible for detached papers to have a general run, or long continuance, if not diversified with humour.
Joseph Addison.    
  3
 
  The genius of the Spanish people is exquisitely subtile, without being at all acute: hence there is so much humour and so little wit in their literature. The genius of the Italians, on the contrary, is acute, profound, and sensual, but not subtile: hence what they think to be humorous is merely witty.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge.    
  4
 
  There are more faults in the humour than in the mind.  5
 
  I agree with Sir William Temple, that the word humour is peculiar to our English tongue; but not that the thing itself is peculiar to the English, because the contrary may be found in many Spanish, Italian, and French productions.
Jonathan Swift.    
  6
 
  The notion of a humorist is one that is greatly pleased, or greatly displeased, with little things; his actions seldom directed by the reason and nature of things.
Dr. Isaac Watts.    
  7
 
 
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