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C.N. Douglas, comp.  Forty Thousand Quotations: Prose and Poetical.  1917.
 
Boyle
 
  As rivers, when they overflow, drown those grounds, and ruin those husbandmen, which, whilst they flowed calmly betwixt their banks, they fertilized and enriched; so our passions, when they grow exorbitant and unruly, destroy those virtues, to which they may be very serviceable whilst they keep within their bounds.  1
  As the moon, though darkened with spots, gives us a much greater light than the stars that seem all-luminous, so do the Scriptures afford more light than the brightest human authors. In them the ignorant may learn all requisite knowledge, and the most knowing may learn to discern their ignorance.  2
  Darkness, that here surrounds our purblind understanding, will vanish at the dawning of eternal day.  3
  Exalt your passion by directing and settling it upon an object the due contemplation of whose loveliness may cure perfectly all hurts received from mortal beauty.  4
  Female beauties are as fickle in their faces as in their minds; though casualties should spare them, age brings in a necessity of decay.  5
  I use the Scriptures, not as an arsenal to be resorted to only for arms and weapons, but as a matchless temple, where I delight to contemplate the beauty, the symmetry, and the magnificence of the structure, and to increase my awe and excite my devotion to the Deity there preached and adored.  6
  In an arch each single stone which, if severed from the rest, would be perhaps defenceless is sufficiently secured by the solidity and entireness of the whole fabric, of which it is a part.  7
  In the Bible the ignorant may learn all requisite knowledge, and the most knowing may learn to discern their ignorance.  8
  It is not strange to me that persons of the fair sex should like, in all things about them, the handsomeness for which they find themselves most liked.  9
  Testimony is like an arrow shot from a long bow, the force of it depends on the strength of the hand that draws it. Argument is like an arrow from a cross-bow, which has equal force though drawn by a child.  10
 
 
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