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C.N. Douglas, comp.  Forty Thousand Quotations: Prose and Poetical.  1917.
 
Mackenzie
 
  Fame is a revenue payable only to our ghosts; and to deny ourselves all present satisfaction, or to expose ourselves to so much hazard for this, were as great madness as to starve ourselves, or fight desperately for food, to be laid on our tombs after our death.  1
  It is from the remembrance of joys we have lost that the arrows of affliction are pointed.  2
  Mankind in the gross is a gaping monster, that loves to be deceived, and has seldom been disappointed.  3
  Pedantry, in the common acceptation of the word, means an absurd ostentation of learning, and stiffness of phraseology, proceeding from a misguided knowledge of books and a total ignorance of men.  4
  People do not care to give alms without some security for their money; and a wooden leg or a withered arm is a sort of draft upon heaven for those who choose to have their money placed to account there.  5
  There are two distinct sorts of what we call bashfulness; this, the awkwardness of a booby, which a few steps into the world will convert into the pertness of a coxcomb; that, a consciousness, which the most delicate feelings produce, and the most extensive knowledge cannot always remove.  6
  There is no use of money equal to that of beneficence; here the enjoyment grows upon reflection.  7
  ’Tis only from the belief of the goodness and wisdom of a Supreme Being that our calamities can be borne in that manner which becomes a man.  8
  What signifies sadness, sir; a man grows lean on it.  9
 
 
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