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C.N. Douglas, comp.  Forty Thousand Quotations: Prose and Poetical.  1917.
 
De Quincey
 
  A great scholar, in the highest sense of the term, is not one who depends simply on an infinite memory, but also on an infinite and electrical power of combination; bringing together from the four winds, like the Angel of the Resurrection, what else were dust from dead men’s bones, into the unity of breathing life.  1
  All parts of knowledge have their origin in metaphysics.  2
  Far better, and more cheerfully, I could dispense with some part of the downright necessaries of life, than with certain circumstances of elegance and propriety in the daily habits of using them.  3
  Fierce sectarianism breeds fierce latitudinarianism.  4
  Grief! thou art classed amongst the depressing passions. And true it is that thou humblest to the dust, but also thou exaltest to the clouds. Thou shakest us with ague, but also thou steadiest like frost. Thou sickenest the heart, but also thou healest its infirmities.  5
  It is an impressive truth that sometimes in the very lowest forms of duty, less than which would rank a man as a villain, there is, nevertheless, the sublimest ascent of self-sacrifice. To do less would class you as an object of eternal scorn, to do so much presumes the grandeur of heroism.  6
  Many a man has risen to eminence under the powerful reaction of his mind in fierce counter-agency to the scorn of the unworthy, daily evoked by his personal defects, who with a handsome person would have sunk into the luxury of a careless life under the tranquillizing smiles of continual admiration.  7
  Mathematics has not a foot to stand upon which is not purely metaphysical.  8
  Reserve is the truest expression of respect towards those who are its objects.  9
  Solitude, though it may be silent as light, is like light, the mightiest of agencies; for solitude is essential to man. All men come into this world alone; all leave it alone.  10
  The laughter of girls is, and ever was, among the delightful sounds of earth.  11
  The pulpit style of Germany has been always rustically negligent, or bristling with pedantry.  12
 
 
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