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C.N. Douglas, comp.  Forty Thousand Quotations: Prose and Poetical.  1917.
 
Mrs. L. M. Child
 
  A human heart can never grow old if it takes a lively interest in the pairing of birds, the reproduction of flowers, and the changing tints of autumn leaves.  1
  An effort made for the happiness of others lifts us above ourselves.  2
  Childhood itself is scarcely more lovely than a cheerful, kindly, sunshiny old age.  3
  Every human soul has a germ of some flowers within; and they would open if they could only find sunshine and free air to expand in. I always told you that not having enough of sunshine was what ailed the world. Make people happy, and there will not be half the quarrelling or a tenth part of the wickedness there is.  4
  Flowers should deck the brow of the youthful bride, for they are in themselves a lovely type of marriage. They should twine round the tomb, for their perpetually renewed beauty is a symbol of the resurrection. They should festoon the altar, for their fragrance and their beauty ascend in perpetual worship before the Most High.  5
  Great is the strength of an individual soul true to its high trust; mighty is it, even to the redemption of a world.  6
  How the universal heart of man blesses flowers! They are wreathed round the cradle, the marriage altar, and the tomb.  7
  I thank my Heavenly Father for every manifestation of human love, I thank Him for all experiences, be they sweet or bitter, which help me to forgive all things, and to enfold the whole world with a blessing.  8
  In politeness, as in many other things connected with the formation of character, people in general begin outside, when they should begin inside; instead of beginning with the heart, and trusting that to form the manners, they begin with the manners, and trust the heart to chance influences.  9
  In thy silent wishing, thy voiceless, unuttered prayer, let the desire be not cherished that afflictions may not visit thee; for well has it been said, “Such prayers never seem to have wings. I am willing to be purified through sorrow, and to accept it meekly as a blessing. I see that all the clouds are angels’ faces, and their voices speak harmoniously of the everlasting chime.”  10
  It is the saddest of all things that even one human soul should dimly perceive the beauty that is ever around us, a perpetual benediction.  11
  Music is a prophecy of what life is to be, the rainbow of promise translated out of seeing into hearing.  12
  O, it is the saddest of all things that even one human soul should dimly perceive the beauty that is ever around us, “a perpetual benediction!” Nature, that great missionary of the Most High, preaches to us forever in all tones of love, and writes truth in all colors, on manuscripts illuminated with stars and flowers.  13
  Society moves slowly towards civilization, but when we compare epochs half a century or even quarter of a century apart, we perceive many signs that progress is made.  14
  The cure for all the ills and wrongs, the cares, the sorrows, and the crimes of humanity, all lie in that one word “love.” It is the divine vitality that everywhere produces and restores life. To each and every one of us, it gives the power of working miracles if we will.  15
  There do remain dispersed in the soil of human nature divers seeds of goodness, of benignity, of ingenuity, which being cherished, excited, and quickened by good culture, do by common experience thrust out flowers very lovely, and yield fruits very pleasant of virtue and goodness.  16
  Whatever is highest and holiest is tinged with melancholy. The eye of genius has always a plaintive expression, and its natural language is pathos. A prophet is sadder than other men; and He who was greater than all prophets was “a man of sorrow and acquainted with grief.”  17
  “Whosoever quarrels with his fate, does not understand it,” says Bettine; and among all her inspired sayings, she spoke none wiser.  18
  You find yourself refreshed by the presence of cheerful people. Why not make earnest effort to confer that pleasure on others? You will find half the battle is gained if you never allow yourself to say anything gloomy.  19
 
 
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