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C.N. Douglas, comp.  Forty Thousand Quotations: Prose and Poetical.  1917.
 
Order
 
  Order is heaven’s first law.
Pope.    
  1
  Order, thou eye of action.
Aaron Hill.    
  2
  Order gave each thing view.
Shakespeare.    
  3
  The gods love those of ordered soul.
Sophocles.    
  4
  Observe degree, priority, and place.
Shakespeare.    
  5
  Let all things be done decently and in order.
Bible.    
  6
  Order is man’s greatest need, and his true well-being.
Amiel.    
  7
  Order means light and peace, inward liberty and free command over one’s self; order is power.
Amiel.    
  8
  You must confine yourself within the modest limits of order.
Shakespeare.    
  9
  Order is to arrangement what the soul is to the body, and what mind is to matter.
Joubert.    
  10
  Order and system are nobler things than power.
Ruskin.    
  11
  The friend of order has made half his way to virtue.
Lavater.    
  12
  Order is the primary regulation of the celestial regions.
J. G. Saxe.    
  13
  Fretfulness of temper will generally characterize those who are negligent of order.
Blair.    
  14
  All are born to observe order, but few are born to establish it.
Joubert.    
  15
  Good order is the foundation of all good things.
Burke.    
  16
        Set all things in their own peculiar place,
And know that order is the greatest grace.
Dryden.    
  17
  He who has no taste for order will be often wrong in his judgment, and seldom considerate or conscientious in his actions.
Lavater.    
  18
        Mark what unvary’d laws preserve each state,
Laws wise as Nature, and as fixed as Fate.
Pope.    
  19
  Order in a house ought to be like the machinery in opera, whose effect produces great pleasure, but whose ends must be hid.
Mme. Necker.    
  20
 
 
  So work the honey-bees, creatures that by a rule in nature teach the act of order to a peopled kingdom.
Shakespeare.    
  21
  Order is the sanity of the mind, the health of the body, the peace of the city, the security of the state. As the beams to a house, as the bones to the microcosm of man, so is order to all things.
Southey.    
  22
        Not chaos-like together crush’d and bruis’d,
But, as the world, harmoniously confused;
Where order in variety we see,
And where, tho’ all things differ, all agree.
Pope.    
  23
        For the world was built in order
  And the atoms march in tune;
Rhyme the pipe, and Time the warder,
  The sun obeys them, and the moon.
Emerson.    
  24
        The heavens themselves, the planets, and this centre
Observe degree, priority, and place,
Insisture, course, proportion, season, form,
Office, and custom, in all line of order.
Shakespeare.    
  25
  Creation is the production of order. What a simple, but, at the same time, comprehensive and pregnant principle is here! Plato could tell his disciples no ultimate truth of more pervading significance. Order is the law of all intelligible existence.
Blakie.    
  26
  Order is a lovely nymph, the child of Beauty and Wisdom; her attendants are Comfort, Neatness, and Activity; her abode is the valley of happiness; she is always to be found when sought for, and never appears so lovely as when contrasted with her opponent, Disorder.
Johnson.    
  27
  There are persons who are never easy unless they are putting your books and papers in order—that is, according to their notions of the matter—and hide things lest they should be lost, where neither the owner nor anybody else can find them. This is a sort of magpie faculty. If anything is left where you want it, it is called litter. There is a pedantry in housewifery, as well as in the gravest concerns. Abraham Tucker complained that whenever his maid servant had been in his library, he could not see comfortably to work again for several days.
Hazlitt.    
  28
 
 
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