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C.N. Douglas, comp.  Forty Thousand Quotations: Prose and Poetical.  1917.
 
Maxims
 
  Good maxims are the germs of all excellence.
Joubert.    
  1
  Strongly stamped, medallion-like sayings.
Emerson.    
  2
  Collect as precious pearls the words of the wise and virtuous.
Abd-el-Kader.    
  3
  Axioms are delightful in theory, but impossible in practice.
Rivarol.    
  4
  Maxims are the condensed good sense of nations.
Sir J. Mackintosh.    
  5
  Maxims are often quoted by those who stand in more need of their application.
James Ellis.    
  6
  A maxim is like the seed of a plant, which the soul it is thrown into must expand into leaves and flowers and fruit.
Mme. de Sartory.    
  7
  Maxims are to the intellect what laws are to actions; they do not enlighten, but they guide and direct, and, although themselves blind, are protective.
Joubert.    
  8
  I am of opinion that there is no proverb which is not true, because they are all sentences drawn from experience itself, the mother of all the sciences.
Cervantes.    
  9
  A maxim is a conclusion upon observation of matters of fact, and is merely speculative; a “principle” carries knowledge within itself, and is prospective.
Coleridge.    
  10
 
 
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