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C.N. Douglas, comp.  Forty Thousand Quotations: Prose and Poetical.  1917.
 
Impudence
 
  What! canst thou say all this and never blush?
Shakespeare.    
  1
  A true and genuine impudence is ever the effect of ignorance, without the least sense of it.
Steele.    
  2
  There is no better provision for life than impudence and a brazen face.
Menander.    
  3
  What was said by the Latin poet of labor—that it conquers all things—is much more true when applied to impudence.
Fielding.    
  4
              He that has but impudence,
To all things has a fair pretence;
And put among his wants but shame,
To all the world may lay his claim.
Butler.    
  5
        With that dull, rooted, callous impudence,
Which, dead to shame, and ev’ry nicer sense,
Ne’er blushed, unless, in spreading vice’s snares,
She blunder’d on some virtue unawares.
Churchill.    
  6
  The way to avoid the imputation of impudence is not to be ashamed of what we do, but never to do what we aught to be ashamed of.
Tully.    
  7
  Impudence is no virtue; yet able to beggar them all; being for the most part in good plight, when the rest starve, and capable of carrying her followers up to the highest preferments; as useful in a court as armor in a camp.
Sir Thomas Osborne.    
  8
 
 
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