Reference > Quotations > C.N. Douglas, comp. > Forty Thousand Quotations > Category Index
  PREVIOUSNEXT  
CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
C.N. Douglas, comp.  Forty Thousand Quotations: Prose and Poetical.  1917.
 
Diligence
 
  Diligence is the mother of good fortune.
Cervantes.    
  1
  Diligence, above all, is the mother of good luck.
Samuel Smiles.    
  2
  Who makes quick use of the moment, is a genius of prudence.
Lavater.    
  3
  That which ordinary men are fit for, I am qualified in; and the best of me is diligence.
Shakespeare.    
  4
  What we hope ever to do with ease we may learn first to do with diligence.
Johnson.    
  5
  It is want of diligence rather than want of means that causes most failures.
Alfred Mercier.    
  6
  Prefer diligence before idleness, unless you esteem rust above brightness.
Plato.    
  7
  The more the marble wastes, the more the statue grows.
Michael Angelo.    
  8
  The expectations of life depend upon diligence; and the mechanic that would perfect his work, must first sharpen his tools.
Confucius.    
  9
        Like clocks, one wheel another on must drive,
Affairs by diligent labors only thrive.
Chapman.    
  10
        To be rich be diligent; move on
Like heav’ns great movers that enrich the earth;
Whose moment’s sloth would show the world undone;
And make the spring straight bury all her birth.
Rich are the diligent who can command
Time—nature’s stock.
Davenant.    
  11
  As he that lives longest lives but a little while, every man may be certain that he has no time to waste. The duties of life are commensurate to its duration; and every day brings its task, which, if neglected, is doubled on the morrow.
Dr. Johnson.    
  12
  Diligence is the mother of good luck, and God gives all things to industry. Then plough deep while sluggards sleep, and you shall have corn to sell and to keep.
Benjamin Franklin.    
  13
  Diligence which, as it avails in all things, is also of the utmost moment in pleading causes. Diligence is to be particularly cultivated by us; it is to be constantly exerted; it is capable of effecting almost everything.
Cicero.    
  14
 
 
CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
  PREVIOUSNEXT  
 
Loading
Click here to shop the Bartleby Bookstore.

Shakespeare · Bible · Strunk · Anatomy · Nonfiction · Quotations · Reference · Fiction · Poetry
© 1993–2014 Bartleby.com · [Top 150] · Subjects · Titles · Authors