Reference > Quotations > C.N. Douglas, comp. > Forty Thousand Quotations > Category Index
  PREVIOUSNEXT  
CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
C.N. Douglas, comp.  Forty Thousand Quotations: Prose and Poetical.  1917.
 
Dignity
 
  Ease with dignity.
Cicero.    
  1
  Dignity and love do not blend.
Mme. Necker.    
  2
  All celebrated people lose on a close view.
Napoleon I.    
  3
  There is even the dignity of vice.
Rivarol.    
  4
  Dignity increases more easily than it begins.
Seneca.    
  5
  Dignity and love were never yet boon companions.
Fielding.    
  6
  Dignity consists not in possessing honors, but in deserving them.
Aristotle.    
  7
  Dignity and love do not blend well, nor do they continue long together.
Ovid.    
  8
  Dignity of manner always conveys a sense of reserved force.
Alcott.    
  9
  Let none presume to wear an undeserved dignity.
Shakespeare.    
  10
  As vivacity is the gift of woman, gravity is that of man.
Addison.    
  11
  There is a healthful hardiness about real dignity that never dreads contact and communion with others, however humble.
Washington Irving.    
  12
        Grace was in all her steps, heaven in her eye,
In every gesture dignity and love.
Milton.    
  13
        True dignity is never gained by place,
And never lost when honours are withdrawn.
Massinger.    
  14
  A fit of anger is as fatal to dignity as a dose of arsenic to life.
J. G. Holland.    
  15
  The nearer we approach great men, the clearer we see that they are men.
La Bruyère.    
  16
  Clay and clay differs in dignity, whose dust is both alike.
Shakespeare.    
  17
  Dignity is often a veil between us and the real truth of things.
Whipple.    
  18
  It is of very little use in trying to be dignified, if dignity is no part of your character.
Bovee.    
  19
  She is calm because she is the mistress of her subject,—the secret of self-possession.
Beaconsfield.    
  20
 
 
  The dignity of truth is lost with much protesting.
Ben Jonson.    
  21
  True dignity is his whose tranquil mind virtue has raised above the things below.
Beattie.    
  22
  In order that she may be able to give her hand with dignity, she must be able to stand alone.
Margaret Fuller Ossoli.    
  23
  Remember this,—that there is a proper dignity and proportion to be observed in the performance of every act of life.
Marcus Aurelius.    
  24
  She hath a natural, wise sincerity, a simple truthfulness; and these have lent her a dignity as moveless as the centre.
Lowell.    
  25
  Men possessing minds which are morose, solemn, and inflexible enjoy generally a greater share of dignity than of happiness.
Bacon.    
  26
  It is at once the thinnest and most effective of all the coverings under which duncedom sneaks and skulks.
Whipple.    
  27
  We have exchanged the Washingtonian dignity for the Jeffersonian simplicity, which was in truth only another name for the Jeffersonian vulgarity.
Bishop Henry C. Potter.    
  28
  Dignity of position adds to dignity of character, as well as to dignity of carriage. Give us a proud position, and we are impelled to act up to it.
Bovee.    
  29
  True dignity abides with him alone who, in the silent hour of inward thought, can still suspect and still revere himself in lowliness of heart.
Wordsworth.    
  30
        The dignity of man into your hands is given;
Oh, keep it well, with you it sinks or lifts itself to heaven.
Schiller.    
  31
        True dignity is his whose tranquil mind
  Virtue has raised above the things below;
Who, every hope and fear to heaven resign’d
  Shrinks not, though fortune aims her deadliest blow.
Beattie.    
  32
                    With grave
Aspect he rose, and in his rising seem’d
A pillar of state; deep on his front engraven
Deliberation sat, and public care;
And princely counsel in his face yet shone
Majestic, though in ruin. Sage he stood,
With Atlantean shoulders, fit to bear
The weight of mightiest monarchies; his look
Drew audience and attention still as night
Or summer’s noontide air.
Milton.    
  33
  Lord Chatham and Napoleon were as much actors as Garrick or Talma. Now, an imposing air should always be taken as evidence of imposition. Dignity is often a veil between us and the real truth of things.
Whipple.    
  34
 
 
CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
  PREVIOUSNEXT  
 
Loading
Click here to shop the Bartleby Bookstore.

Shakespeare · Bible · Strunk · Anatomy · Nonfiction · Quotations · Reference · Fiction · Poetry
© 1993–2014 Bartleby.com · [Top 150] · Subjects · Titles · Authors