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C.N. Douglas, comp.  Forty Thousand Quotations: Prose and Poetical.  1917.
 
Admiration
 
  Fools admire, but men of sense approve.
Pope.    
  1
  Distance is a great promoter of admiration!
Diderot.    
  2
  Few men are admired by their servants.
Montaigne.    
  3
  Admiration is the basis of ignorance.
Balthasar Gracian.    
  4
  Season your admiration for awhile.
Shakespeare.    
  5
  Admiration and familiarity are strangers.
George Sand.    
  6
  We live by admiration, hope, and love.
Wordsworth.    
  7
  For her own person, it beggared all description.
Shakespeare.    
  8
  Admiration begins where acquaintance ceases.
Dr. Johnson.    
  9
  None knew thee but to love thee, nor named thee but to praise.
Fitz-Greene Halleck.    
  10
  Admiration is a youthful fancy which scarcely ever survives to mature years.
H. W. Shaw.    
  11
  All things are admired either because they are new or because they are great.
Bacon.    
  12
  We always love those who admire us, and we do not always love those whom we admire.
La Rochefoucauld.    
  13
        The king himself has follow’d her,
  When she has walk’d before.
Goldsmith.    
  14
  There is a long and wearisome step between admiration and imitation.
Richter.    
  15
  Those who are formed to win general admiration are seldom calculated to bestow individual happiness.
Lady Blessington.    
  16
  When we view elevated ideas of Nature, the result of that view is admiration, which is always the cause of pleasure.
Dryden.    
  17
  Amid the most mercenary ages it is but a secondary sort of admiration that is bestowed upon magnificence.
Shenstone.    
  18
  That which astonishes, astonishes once; but whatever is admirable becomes more and more admired.
Joubert.    
  19
  No nobler feeling than this of admiration for one higher than himself dwells in the breast of man.
Carlyle.    
  20
 
 
  Not to be lost in idle admiration is the only sure means of making and of preserving happiness.
Horace.    
  21
  Admiration is a forced tribute; and to extort it from mankind, envious and ignorant as they are, they must be taken unawares.
James Northcote.    
  22
  The beauty that addresses itself to the eyes is only the spell of the moment: the eye of the body is not always that of the soul.
George Sand.    
  23
  Admiration must be continued by that novelty which first produces it; and how much soever is given, there must always be reason to imagine that more remains.
Johnson.    
  24
  To cultivate sympathy you must be among living creatures, and thinking about them; and to cultivate admiration, you must be among beautiful things and looking at them.
Ruskin.    
  25
  It may be laid down as a general rule, that no woman who hath any great pretensions to admiration is ever well pleased in a company where she perceives herself to fill only the second place.
Fielding.    
  26
  The love of admiration leads to fraud, much more than the love of commendation; but, on the other hand, the latter is much more likely to spoil our good actions by the substitution of an inferior motive.
Bishop Whately.    
  27
  It is better in some respects to be admired by those with whom you live, than to be loved by them; and this not on account of any gratification of vanity, but because admiration is so much more tolerant than love.
Arthur Helps.    
  28
  Admiration is a very short-lived passion, that immediately decays upon growing familiar with its object, unless it be still fed with such discoveries, and kept alive by a new perpetual succession of miracles rising up to its view.
Addison.    
  29
  There is a wide difference between admiration and love. The sublime, which is the cause of the former, always dwells on great objects and terrible; the latter on small ones and pleasing; we submit to what we admire, but we love what submits to us: in one case we are forced, in the other we are flattered, into compliance.
Burke.    
  30
 
 
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