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C.N. Douglas, comp.  Forty Thousand Quotations: Prose and Poetical.  1917.
 
Caution
 
  Hasten slowly.
Augustus Cæsar.    
  1
  Pitchers have ears.
Shakespeare.    
  2
  Little boats should keep near shore.
Franklin.    
  3
  The cautious seldom err.
Confucius.    
  4
  Caution is the lower story of prudence.
Carlyle.    
  5
  All is to be feared where all is to be lost.
Byron.    
  6
  Caution, though very often wasted is a good risk to take.
H. W. Shaw.    
  7
  Among mortals second thoughts are wisest.
Euripides.    
  8
  A hare is not caught with a drum.
La Fontaine.    
  9
  Be cautious and bold.
Rothschild.    
  10
  Be slow of tongue and quick of eye.
Cervantes.    
  11
  Caution is the eldest child of wisdom.
Victor Hugo.    
  12
  It is a good thing to learn caution by the misfortunes of others.
Publius Syrus.    
  13
  Man’s caution often into danger turns, and his guard falling crushes him to death.
Young.    
  14
  When clouds are seen, wise men put on their cloaks.
Shakespeare.    
  15
                    Who ’scapes the snare
Once, has a certain caution to beware.
Chapman.    
  16
  Open your mouth and purse cautiously, and your stock of wealth and reputation shall, at least in repute, be great.
Zimmermann.    
  17
  The way out of our narrowness may not be so easy as the way in. The weasel that creeps into the corn-bin has to starve himself before he can leave by the same passage.
Bartol.    
  18
  I knew a wise man who had it for a by-word when he saw men hasten to a conclusion: “Stay a little, that we may make an end the sooner.”
Bacon.    
  19
                    Trust none,
For oaths are straws, men’s faiths are wafer cakes,
And hold-fast is the only dog.
Shakespeare.    
  20
 
 
        The wound of peace is surety,
Surety secure; but modest doubt is called
The beacon of the wise, the ’tent that searches
To the bottom of the worst.
Shakespeare.    
  21
  When you have need of a needle, you move your fingers delicately, with a wise caution. Use the same precaution with the inevitable dullness of life; give attention; keep yourself from imprudent precipitation; and do not take it by the point.
Rance.    
  22
        But now so wise and wary was the knight
By trial of his former harms and cares,
That he descry’d and shunned still his slight;
The fish, that once was caught, new bait will hardly bite.
Spenser.    
  23
  The bird alighteth not on the spread net when it beholds another bird in the snare. Take warning by the misfortunes of others, that others may not take example from you.
Saadi.    
  24
 
 
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