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CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
C.N. Douglas, comp.  Forty Thousand Quotations: Prose and Poetical.  1917.
 
Welcome
 
  Welcome as happy tidings after fears.
Otway.    
  1
  Small cheer and great welcome makes a merry feast.
Shakespeare.    
  2
  Stay is a charming word in a friend’s vocabulary.
A. Bronson Alcott.    
  3
  To say you are welcome were superfluous.
Shakespeare.    
  4
                    Trust me, sweet,
Out of this silence yet I pick’d a welcome.
Shakespeare.    
  5
  How beautiful upon the mountains are the feet of him that bringeth good tidings!
Bible.    
  6
  His worth is warrant for his welcome.
Shakespeare.    
  7
  Welcome as kindly showers to long-parched earth.
Dryden.    
  8
        Welcome, my old friend,
Welcome to a foreign fireside.
Longfellow.    
  9
  I hold your dainties cheap, sir, and your welcome dear.
Shakespeare.    
  10
  The appurtenance of welcome is fashion and ceremony.
Shakespeare.    
  11
        A table full of welcome makes scarce one dainty dish.
Shakespeare.    
  12
  The atmosphere breathes rest and comfort, and the many chambers seem full of welcome.
Longfellow.    
  13
        And kind the voice and glad the eyes
That welcome my return at night.
William Cullen Bryant.    
  14
        A hundred thousand welcomes; I could weep,
And I could laugh; I am light and heavy; Welcome.
Shakespeare.    
  15
                Welcome ever smiles,
And Farewell goes out sighing.
Shakespeare.    
  16
                I am glad to see you well;
Horatio,—or I do forget myself.
Shakespeare.    
  17
  ’Tis sweet to hear the watchdog’s honest bark bay deep-mouthed welcome as we draw near home.
Byron.    
  18
  I reckon this always,—that a man is never undone till he be hanged; nor never welcome to a place till some certain shot be paid and the hostess say, Welcome.
Shakespeare.    
  19
        Sir, you are very welcome to our house:
It must appear in other ways than words,
Therefore I scant this breathing courtesy.
Shakespeare.    
  20
 
 
                    Bid that welcome
Which comes to punish us, and we punish it
Seeming to bear it lightly.
Shakespeare.    
  21
        I hope, as no unwelcome guest,
At your warm fireside, when the lamps are lighted,
To have my place reserved among the rest,
Nor stand as one unsought and uninvited!
Longfellow.    
  22
        Shall I meet other wayfarers at night?
  Those who have gone before.
Then must I knock, or call when just in sight?
  They will not keep you standing at that door.
Christina G. Rossetti.    
  23
        Come in the evening, or come in the morning,
Come when you’re looked for, or come without warning,
Kisses and welcome you’ll find here before you,
And the oftener you come here the more I’ll adore you.
Thomas O. Davis.    
  24
        A general welcome from his grace
Salutes ye all: This night he dedicates
To fair content, and you: none here, he hopes
In all this noble bevy, has brought with her
One care abroad: he would have all as merry
As first-good company, good wine, good welcome
Can make good people.
Shakespeare.    
  25
 
 
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