Verse > Anthologies > T. H. Ward, ed. > The English Poets > Vol. III. Addison to Blake
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CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD

Thomas Humphry Ward, ed.  The English Poets.  1880–1918.
 
Vol. III. The Eighteenth Century: Addison to Blake
 
Joseph Addison.
 1672–1719.  
Critical Introduction by William John Courthope
Extract from The Letter from Italy: The Blessings of Liberty
Extract from The Campaign: Marlborough at Blenheim
William Walsh.
 1663–1708.  
Critical Introduction by Edmund W. Gosse
To His Book
Sonnet: ‘What has this bugbear death that ’s worth our care?’
The Despairing Lover
William Congreve.
 1670–1729.  
Critical Introduction by Henry Austin Dobson
Amoret
Song: ‘False though she be to me and love
Sir Samuel Garth.
 1661–1719.  
Critical Introduction by George Saintsbury
Extracts from The Dispensary
Matthew Prior.
 1664–1721.  
Critical Introduction by Henry Austin Dobson
The Secretary
To a Child of Quality, Five Years Old
A Song: ‘In vain you tell your parting lover
To a Lady
An Ode: ‘The merchant, to secure his treasure
Cupid Mistaken
A Better Answer
A Simile
Epigram: ‘To John I owed great obligation
Another: ‘Yes, every poet is a fool
For My Own Tomb-stone
Anne Finch, Countess of Winchilsea.
 1661–1720.  
Critical Introduction by Edmund W. Gosse
To the Nightingale
The Tree
A Nocturnal Reverie
Extract from An Ode to the Spleen
In Answer to Mr. Pope
Jonathan Swift.
 1667–1745.  
Critical Introduction by John Nichol
A Description of the Morning
Horace, Book IV, Ode IX
Apollo’s Edict
Extract from Cadenus and Vanessa
The Beasts’ Confession
The Day of Judgment
Extracts from Verses on the Death of Dr. Swift
Alexander Pope.
 1688–1744.  
Critical Introduction by Mark Pattison
Extract from The Essay on Criticism
The Rape of the Lock, Canto II
    Canto III
Extract from The Iliad, Book VIII
Elegy to the Memory of an Unfortunate Lady
Extracts from the Essay on Man: Book I
    Book IV
Extract from Moral Essays, Epistle I
Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot
From the First Epistle of the Second Book of Horace Imitated
Extract from the Epilogue to the Satires
Extract from the Dunciad, Book IV
Conclusion of the Dunciad
Ambrose Philips.
 1674–1749.  
Critical Introduction by Edmund W. Gosse
Extract from the Ode to Miss Carteret
To Miss Charlotte Pulteney, in Her Mother’s Arms
Thomas Parnell.
 1679–1718.  
Critical Introduction by Edmund W. Gosse
Extract from A Night-Piece on Death
Extract from A Hymn to Contentment
The Hermit
John Gay.
 1685–1732.  
Critical Introduction by Henry Austin Dobson
Extract from The Shepherd’s Week
A Ballad from The What d’ye Call It
The Hare with Many Friends
Black-eyed Susan
Thomas Tickell.
 1686–1740.  
Critical Introduction by Edmund W. Gosse
To the Earl of Warwick, on the Death of Mr. Addison
Allan Ramsay.
 1686–1758.  
Critical Introduction by William Minto
Extracts from The Gentle Shepherd: Jenny and Peggy
    Patie and Peggy
Extracts from The Tea-Table Miscellany: Through the Wood, Laddie
    An Thou Were My Ain Thing
James Thomson.
 1700–1748.  
Critical Introduction by George Saintsbury
Extracts from The Seasons: A Snow Scene, from ‘Winter
    The Sheep-washing, from ‘Summer
    The Coming of the Rain, from ‘Spring
    Storm in Harvest, from ‘Autumn
To Her I Love
Extracts from the Castle of Indolence. Book I
John Armstrong.
 1709–1779.  
Critical Introduction by George Saintsbury
Extract from The Art of Preserving Health, Book III
    Book IV
Extract from Taste, an Epistle to a Young Critic
William Somerville.
 1675–1742.  
Critical Introduction by Edmund W. Gosse
Extract from The Chase, Book I
    Book II
Matthew Green.
 1696–1737.  
Critical Introduction by Henry Austin Dobson
Extracts from The Spleen
On Barclay’s Apology for the Quakers
John Dyer.
 1700?–1758.  
Critical Introduction by Edward Dowden
Grongar Hill
Extracts from The Fleece, Book I
Robert Blair.
 1699–1746.  
Critical Introduction by George Saintsbury
Extracts from The Grave: Self-Murder
    Omnes eodem cogimur
    The Resurrection
Edward Young.
 1681–1765.  
Critical Introduction by George Saintsbury
Extract from The Last Day, Book I
The Old Coquette (from Satire V, on Women)
Extracts from Night Thoughts: Procrastination, from The Complaint, Night I
    The Death of Friends, from Night III
    Aspiration, from Night IV
    The Stream of Life, from Night V
John Byrom.
 1692–1763.  
Critical Introduction by William Ernest Henley
The Nimmers
Careless Content
On the Origin of Evil
Epigrams
Richard Glover.
 1712–1785.  
Critical Introduction by Thomas Arnold
Polydorus and Maron (from Leonidas, Book IX)
Ballad of Admiral Hosier’s Ghost
Samuel Johnson.
 1709–1784.  
Critical Introduction by William John Courthope
Thales’ Reasons for Leaving London (from London)
Extracts from The Vanity of Human Wishes: The Rise and Fall of Wolsey
    The True Objects of Desire
Prologue Spoken at the Opening of the Drury Lane Theatre, 1747
Prologue to the Comedy of A Word to the Wise
John and Charles Wesley.  Critical Introduction by Arthur Penrhyn Stanley
Charles Wesley.
 1707–1788.  
Christmas Hymn
Easter Hymn
Christ, the Refuge of the Soul
Christ Our Example
Wrestling Jacob
Catholic Love
John Wesley.
 1703–1791.  
An Hymn for Seriousness
William Shenstone.
 1714–1763.  
Critical Introduction by George Saintsbury
Suffering and Sympathy (from The Schoolmistress)
Pastoral Ballad
The Dying Kid
Much Taste and Small Estate (from The Progress of Taste)
William Collins.
 1721–1759.  
Critical Introduction by Algernon Charles Swinburne
Ode to Liberty
Ode: ‘How sleep the brave, who sink to rest
Ode to Evening
The Passions
Ode on the Death of Mr. Thomson
An Ode on the Popular Superstitions of the Highlands of Scotland
Dirge in Cymbeline
Thomas Gray.
 1716–1771.  
Critical Introduction by Matthew Arnold
Ode on the Spring
Ode on a Distant Prospect of Eton College
Hymn to Adversity
The Progress of Poesy
The Bard
Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard
Sonnet on the Death of Mr. Richard West
Sketch of His Own Character
Impromptu on Lord Holland’s Seat at Kingsgate
William Whitehead.
 1715–1785.  
Critical Introduction by Thomas Humphry Ward
The Enthusiast. An Ode
Mark Akenside.
 1721–1770.  
Critical Introduction by Edward Dowden
Extract from The Pleasures of Imagination
On the Winter Solstice, 1740
For a Grotto
Christopher Smart.
 1722–1771.  
Critical Introduction by Thomas Humphry Ward
Extracts from A Song to David
William Falconer.
 1732–1769.  
Critical Introduction by Edward Dowden
Extract from The Shipwreck, Canto III
Oliver Goldsmith.
 1730–1774.  
Critical Introduction by Edward Dowden
Extract from The Deserted Village
Extract from Retaliation
Stanzas on Woman
Thomas Warton.
 1728–1790.  
Critical Introduction by Thomas Humphry Ward
Extract from The Triumph of Isis
Extract from The First of April
Sonnet Written in a Blank Leaf of Dugdale’s ‘Monasticon
To the River Lodon
Charles Churchill.
 1731–1764.  
Critical Introduction by E. J. Payne
Description of His Muse (from The Prophecy of Famine)
Characters of Actors (from The Rosciad)
Description of Johnson (from The Ghost)
Charles the First (from Gotham)
James Beattie.
 1735–1803.  
Critical Introduction by George Saintsbury
Extract from The Minstrel, Book I
Thomas Chatterton.
 1752–1770.  
Critical Introduction by Theodore Watts-Dunton
An Excellent Ballad of Charity
Eclogue the First
Eclogue the Third
Minstrel’s Marriage-Song (from Œlla: a Tragical Interlude)
The Accounte of W. Canynge’s Feast
Minstrel’s Roundelay (from Œlla)
William Cowper.
 1731–1800.  
Critical Introduction by Thomas Humphry Ward
The Past and Future of Poetry (from Table Talk)
Grace and the World (from Hope)
Extracts from Conversation: Characters and Sketches
    An Afternoon Call
Extracts from Retirement: Dejection and Retirement. The Retired Statesman
    What to Read
A Comparison
The Jackdaw
Boadicea. An Ode
Extracts from the Task: Relish of Fair Prospect
    Crazy Kate. The Gipsies
    England
    Autobiographical
    The Post. The Fireside in Winter
    Snow
    Early Love of the Country and of Poetry
    Meditation in Winter
    The Poet in the Woods
An Epistle to Joseph Hill, Esq.
To the Rev. Mr. Newton
On the Loss of the Royal George
Epitaph on a Hare
On the Death of Mrs. Throckmorton’s Bullfinch
The Acquiescence of Pure Love
On the Receipt of My Mother’s Picture
The Poplar Field
To Mary
The Castaway
Scotch Song-writers.  Critical Introduction by William Minto
John Skinner.
 1721–1807.  
Tullochgorum
George Halket.
 d. 1756.  
Logie o’ Buchan
Alexander Geddes.
 1737–1802.  
Lewie Gordon
Jean Adam.
 1704–1765.  
There ’s Nae Luck about the House
Isabel Pagan.
 c. 1740–1821.  
Ca’ the Yowes
Jane Elliott.
 1727–1805.  
The Flowers of the Forest
John Mayne.
 1759–1836.  
Logan Braes
Adam Austin.
 1726?–1774.  
For Lack of Gold
Adam Skirving.
 1719–1803.  
Johnnie Cope
Robert Fergusson.
 1750–1774.  
Critical Introduction by John Service
The Daft Days
Braid Claith
Extract from Caller Water
Ode to the Gowdspink
Robert Burns.
 1759–1796.  
Critical Introduction by John Service
Mary Morison
My Nanie, O
Green Grow the Rashes. A Fragment
The Death and Dying Words of Poor Mailie, the Author’s Only Pet Yowe
Extract from An Epistle to John Lapraik, an Old Scottish Bard
To a Mouse, on Turning Her up in Her Nest, with the Plough
The Cotter’s Saturday Night
Address to the Deil
Extract from The Holy Fair
Epistle to a Young Friend
A Bard’s Epitaph
Extract from The Epistle to Mrs. Scott of Wauchope
The Birks of Aberfeldy
Of a’ the Airts the Wind Can Blaw
Auld Lang Syne
John Anderson, My Jo
Tam Glen
The Happy Trio
To Mary in Heaven
Tam o’ Shanter. A Tale
The Banks o’ Doon
Farewell to Nancy
Highland Mary
Duncan Gray
Whistle, and I ’ll Come to Ye, My Lad
Bannockburn. Robert Bruce’s Address to His Army
A Red, Red Rose
My Nanie ’s awa
A Man ’s a Man for a’ That
Address to the Woodlark
This Is No My Ain Lassie
Last May a Braw Wooer
O Wert Thou in the Cauld Blast
Carolina Oliphant, Lady Nairne.
 1766–1845.  
Critical Introduction by William Minto
Wha ’ll Be King but Charlie?
The Land o’ the Leal
Anna Letitia Barbauld.
 1743–1825.  
Critical Introduction by Agnes Mary Frances Duclaux (Robinson-Darmesteter)
Ode to Spring
Life
George Crabbe.
 1754–1832.  
Critical Introduction by William John Courthope
The Village As It Is (from The Village)
Extracts from The Borough: The Convict’s Dream
    Strolling Players
    The Founder of the Almshouse
    A Storm on the East Coast
An Entanglement (from Tales of the Hall)
William Blake.
 1757–1827.  
Critical Introduction by J. Comyns Carr
Extracts from Poetical Sketches: To the Evening Star
     Song: ‘How sweet I roamed from field to field
     Song: ‘My silks and fine array
     Song: ‘Memory, hither come
     Mad Song
     To the Muses
Extracts from Songs of Innocence: Introduction
    The Lamb
    Night
Extracts from Songs of Experience: Ah, Sunflower
    The Tiger
    The Angel

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