Verse > Anthologies > T. H. Ward, ed. > The English Poets > Vol. I. Chaucer to Donne
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Thomas Humphry Ward, ed.  The English Poets.  1880–1918.
Vol. I. Early Poetry: Chaucer to Donne
 
The Passionate Shepherd to His Love
By Christopher Marlowe (1564–1593)
 
COME live with me, and be my love;
And we will all the pleasures prove
That hills and valleys, dales and fields,
Woods or steepy mountain yields.
 
And we will sit upon the rocks,        5
Seeing the shepherds feed their flocks
By shallow rivers, to whose falls
Melodious birds sing madrigals.
 
And I will make thee beds of roses,
And a thousand fragrant posies;        10
A cap of flowers, and a kirtle
Embroider’d all with leaves of myrtle;
 
A gown made of the finest wool
Which from our pretty lambs we pull;
Fair-linèd slippers for the cold,        15
With buckles of the purest gold;
 
A belt of straw and ivy-buds,
With coral clasps and amber studs:
An if these pleasures may thee move,
Come live with me, and be my love.        20
 
The shepherd-swains shall dance and sing
For thy delight each May morning:
If these delights thy mind may move,
Then live with me, and be my love.
 
 
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