Verse > Anthologies > T. H. Ward, ed. > The English Poets > Vol. V. Browning to Rupert Brooke
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Thomas Humphry Ward, ed.  The English Poets.  1880–1918.
Vol. V. Browning to Rupert Brooke
 
If This Were Faith
By Robert Louis Stevenson (1850–1894)
 
GOD, if this were enough,
That I see things here to the buff
And up to the buttocks in mire;
That I ask nor hope nor hire,
Nut in the husk,        5
Nor dawn beyond the dusk,
Nor life beyond death:
God, if this were faith?
 
Having felt Thy wind in my face
Spit sorrow and disgrace,        10
Having seen Thine evil doom
In Golgotha and Khartoum,
And the brutes, the work of Thine hands,
Fill with injustice lands
And stain with blood the sea:        15
If still in my veins the glee
Of the black night and the sun
And the lost battle, run:
If, an adept,
The iniquitous lists I still accept        20
With joy, and joy to endure and be withstood,
And still to battle and perish for a dream of good:
God, if that were enough?
 
If to feel in the ink of the slough,
And the sink of the mire,        25
Veins of glory and fire
Run through and transpierce and transpire,
And a secret purpose of glory in every part.
And the answering glory of battle fill my heart;
To thrill with the joy of girded men,        30
To go on for ever and fail and go on again.
And be mauled to the earth and arise,
And contend for the shade of a word and a thing not seen with the eyes:
With the half of a broken hope for a pillow at night
That somehow the right is the right        35
And the smooth shall bloom from the rough:
Lord, if that were enough?
 
 
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