Verse > Anthologies > T. H. Ward, ed. > The English Poets > Vol. V. Browning to Rupert Brooke
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Thomas Humphry Ward, ed.  The English Poets.  1880–1918.
Vol. V. Browning to Rupert Brooke
 
Persistent Music
By Philip Bourke Marston (1850–1887)
 
LO! what am I, my Heart, that I should dare
  To love her, who will never love again?
  I, standing out here in the wind and rain,
With feet unsandalled, and uncovered hair,
Singing sad words to a still sadder air,        5
  Who know not even if my song’s refrain—
  “Of sorrow, sorrow! loved, oh, loved in vain!”—
May reach her where she sits and hath no care.
 
But I will sing in every man’s despite;
  Yea, too, and love, and sing of love until        10
My music mixes with her dreams at night;
  That when Death says to me, “Lie down, be still!”
She, pausing for my voice, and list’ning long,
May know its silence sadder than its song.
 
 
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