Verse > Anthologies > T. H. Ward, ed. > The English Poets > Vol. V. Browning to Rupert Brooke
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Thomas Humphry Ward, ed.  The English Poets.  1880–1918.
Vol. V. Browning to Rupert Brooke
 
Extracts from Poems and Ballads, Third Series: From Pan and Thalassius
By Algernon Charles Swinburne (1837–1909)
 
THALASSIUS

  PAN!
                Pan!
O sea-stray, seed of Apollo,
  What word wouldst thou have with me?
My ways thou wast fain to follow        5
  Or ever the years hailed thee
                Man.
 
                Now
If August brood on the valleys,
  If satyrs laugh on the lawns,        10
What part in the wildwood alleys
  Hast thou with the fleet-foot fauns—
                Thou?
 
                See!
Thy feet are a man’s—not cloven        15
  Like these, not light as a boy’s:
The tresses and tendrils inwoven
  That lure us, the lure of them cloys
                Thee.
 
                Us        20
The joy of the wild woods never
  Leaves free of the thirst it slakes:
The wild love throbs in us ever
  That burns in the dense hot brakes
                Thus.        25
 
                Life,
Eternal, passionate, aweless,
  Insatiable, mutable, dear,
Makes all men’s laws for us lawless:
  We strive not: how should we fear        30
                Strife?
 
                We,
The birds and the bright winds know not
  Such joys as are ours in the mild
Warm woodland; joys such as grow not        35
  In waste green fields of the wild
                Sea.
 
                No;
Long since, in the world’s wind veering,
  Thy heart was estrangèd from me:        40
Sweet Echo shall yield thee not hearing:
  What have we to do with thee?
                Go.
 
 
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