Verse > Anthologies > T. R. Smith, ed. > Poetica Erotica: A Collection of Rare and Curious Amatory Verse
  PREVIOUSNEXT  
CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
T. R. Smith, comp.  Poetica Erotica: Rare and Curious Amatory Verse.  1921–22.
 
Narcissus, Come Kiss Us!
Anonymous
 
(Rawlinson MS. Poet; (c. 1610–50;) also Ane Pleasant Garden)

AS I was a walking, I cannot tell where,
  Nor whither, in verse or in prose;
Nor know I the meaning, altho’ they all sate,
  Even, as it were, under my nose.
But ever and ever the ladies all cried,        5
“Narcissus, come kiss us, and love us beside.”
 
There came in a lad from I cannot tell where,
  With I cannot tell what in his hand;
It was a fine thing, tho’ it had little sense,
  But yet it would lustily stand.        10
Then ever and ever the ladies all cried,
“Narcissus, come kiss us, and love us beside.”
 
Some shaked it, some stroked it, some kiss’d it, it’s said,
  For it looked so lovely indeed,
All loved it as honey, and none were afraid,        15
  Because of their bodily need.
Then ever and ever the ladies all cried,
“Narcissus, come kiss us, and love us beside.”
 
At length he did put his pretty fine toy
  (I cannot tell were ’twas) below,        20
Into one of these ladies, I cannot tell why,
  Nor wherefore, that he should do so.
Then ever and ever the ladies all cried,
“Narcissus, come kiss us, and love us beside.”
 
But when these fair ladies had sported all night,        25
  And rifled Dame Nature’s scant store;
And pleasured themselves with Venus’ delight,
  Till the youth could hardly do more.
Then ever and ever the ladies all cried,
“Narcissus, come kiss us, and love us beside.”        30
 
The lad being tired, began to retreat,
  And hang down his head like a flower;
The ladies the more did desire a new heat,
  But alas! it was out of his power.
But ever and ever the ladies all cried,        35
“Narcissus, come kiss us, and love us beside.”
 
When full forty weeks were expired,
  A pitiful story to tell,
These ladies did get what they little desired,
  For their bellies began for to swell.        40
Still ever and ever the ladies all cried,
“Narcissus, come kiss us, and love us beside.”
 
Lucina in pity then sent them her aid,
  To cease them of all their sorrow;
But when these fair ladies were once brought to bed,        45
  They still had the same mind tomorrow.
And dandling their babies they rantingly—cried,
“Narcissus, shant miss us, and be by our side!”
 
 
CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
  PREVIOUSNEXT  
 
Loading
Click here to shop the Bartleby Bookstore.

Shakespeare · Bible · Strunk · Anatomy · Nonfiction · Quotations · Reference · Fiction · Poetry
© 1993–2014 Bartleby.com · [Top 150] · Subjects · Titles · Authors