Verse > Anthologies > William Stanley Braithwaite, ed. > The Book of Georgian Verse
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William Stanley Braithwaite, ed.  The Book of Georgian Verse.  1909.
 
Good Night
By Robert Tannahill (1774–1810)
 
THE EVENING sun’s gaen down the west,
  The birds sit nodding on the tree;
All nature now prepares for rest,
  But rest prepared there’s none for me.
The trumpet sounds to war’s alarms,        5
  The drums they beat, the fifes they play,—
Come, Mary, cheer me wi’ thy charms,
  For the morn I will be far away.
 
    Good night, and joy—good night, and joy,
      Good night, and joy be wi’ you a’;        10
    For since it’s so that I must go,
      Good night, and joy be wi’ you a’!
 
I grieve to leave my comrades dear,
  I mourn to leave my native shore;
To leave my agèd parents here,        15
  And the bonnie lass whom I adore.
But tender thoughts maun now be hushed,
  When danger calls I must obey,
The transport waits us on the coast,
  And the morn I will be far away.
    Good night, and joy, etc.
        20
 
Adieu, dear Scotia’s sea-beat coast!
  Though bleak and drear thy mountains be,
When on the heaving ocean tost
  I’ll cast a wishful look to thee!
And now, dear Mary, fare thee well,        25
  May Providence thy guardian be!
Or in the camp, or on the field,
  I’ll heave a sigh, and think on thee!
 
    Good night, and joy—good night, and joy,
      Good night, and joy be wi’ you a’;        30
    For since it’s so that I must go,
      Good night, and joy be wi’ you a’!
 
 
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