Verse > Anthologies > William Stanley Braithwaite, ed. > The Book of Restoration Verse
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William Stanley Braithwaite, ed.  The Book of Restoration Verse.  1910.
 
Lord Donald
Anonymous
 
O WHERE 1 hae ye been a’ day, Lord Donald, my son?
O where hae ye been a’ day, my jollie young man?’
‘I’ve been awa’ courtin’: mither, mak my bed sune,
For I’m sick at the heart, and I fain wad lie doun.’
 
‘What wad ye hae for your supper, Lord Donald, my son?        5
What wad ye hae for your supper, my jollie young man?’
‘I’ve gotten my supper; mither, mak my bed sune,
For I’m sick at the heart, and I fain wad lie doun.’
 
‘What did ye get to your supper, Lord Donald, my son?
What did ye get to your supper, my jollie young man?’        10
‘A dish of sma’ fishes; mither, mak my bed sune,
For I’m sick at the heart, and I fain wad lie doun.’
 
‘Whare gat ye the fishes, Lord Donald, my son?
Whare gat ye the fishes, my jollie young man?’
‘In my father’s black ditches; mither, mak my bed sune,        15
For I’m sick at the heart, and I fain wad lie doun.’
 
‘What like were your fishes, Lord Donald, my son?
What like were your fishes, my jollie young man?’
‘Black backs and speckl’d bellies; mither, mak my bed sune,
For I’m sick at the heart, and I fain wad lie doun.’        20
 
‘O I fear ye are poison’d, Lord Donald, my son!
O I fear ye are poison’d, my jollie young man!’
‘O yes! I am poison’d; mither mak my bed sune,
For I’m sick at the heart, and I fain wad lie doun.’
 
‘What will ye leave to your father, Lord Donald, my son?        25
What will ye leave to your father, my jollie young man?’
‘Baith my houses and land; mither, mak my bed sune,
For I’m sick at the heart, and I fain wad lie doun.’
 
‘What will ye leave to your brither, Lord Donald, my son?
What will ye leave to your brither, my jollie young man?’        30
‘My horse and the saddle; mither, mak my bed sune,
For I’m sick at the heart, and I fain wad lie doun.’
 
‘What will ye leave to your sister, Lord Donald, my son?
What will ye leave to your sister, my jollie young man?’
‘Baith my gold box and rings; mither, mak my bed sune,        35
For I’m sick at the heart, and I fain wad lie doun.’
 
‘What will ye leave to your true-love, Lord Donald, my son?
What will ye leave to your true-love, my jollie young man?’
‘The tow and the halter, for to hang on yon tree,
And lat her hang there for the poysoning o’ me.’        40
 
Note 1. From Kinloch’s Ancient Scottish Ballads. It belongs to the group of ballads involving a domestic tragedy through faithlessness or folly of true-love as here, of mother (Edward), of brother, of sister, of father (Bewick and Grahame), and of husband (Clerk Cloven), etc. (Gummere). The ballad is also familiarly known as Lord Randal in Scott’s version in the Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border. It is supposed that Lord Donald had been poisoned by eating toads prepared as fishes. [back]
 
 
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