Verse > Anthologies > William Stanley Braithwaite, ed. > The Book of Elizabethan Verse
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William Stanley Braithwaite, ed.  The Book of Elizabethan Verse.  1907.
 
A Double Doubting
Anonymous
 
LADY, 1 when I behold the roses sprouting,
Which clad in damask mantles deck the arbours,
  And then behold your lips where sweet love harbours,
My eyes present me with a double doubting:
For viewing both alike, hardly my mind supposes        5
Whether the roses be your lips, or your lips the roses.
 
Note 1. From John Wilbye’s Madrigals, 1598. It is a translation from the Italian. There is another and poorer translation made by Lodge and printed earlier, in his The Life and Death of William Longbeard. [back]
 
 
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