Verse > Anthologies > William Stanley Braithwaite, ed. > The Book of Elizabethan Verse
  PREVIOUSNEXT  
CONTENTS · GLOSSARY · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
William Stanley Braithwaite, ed.  The Book of Elizabethan Verse.  1907.
 
Song: ‘Doubt you to whom my Muse these notes intendeth’
By Sir Philip Sidney (1554–1586)
 
DOUBT 1 you to whom my Muse these notes intendeth,
Which now my breast o’ercharged to music lendeth
To you! to you! all song of praise is due:
Only in you, my song begins and endeth.
 
Who hath the eyes which marry State with Pleasure?        5
Who keeps the key of Nature’s chiefest treasure?
To you! to you! all song of praise is due:
Only for you, the heaven forgat all measure.
 
Who hath the lips, where Wit in fairness reigneth?
Who womankind at once both decks and staineth?        10
To you! to you! all song of praise is due:
Only by you, Cupid his crown maintaineth.
 
Who hath the feet, whose step all sweetness planteth?
Who else, for whom Fame worthy trumpets wanteth?
To you! to you! all song of praise is due:        15
Only to you, her sceptre Venus granteth.
 
Who hath the breast, whose milk doth passions nourish?
Whose grace is such, that when it chides doth cherish?
To you! to you! all song of praise is due:
Only through you, the tree of life doth flourish.        20
 
Who hath the hand, which without stroke subdueth?
Who long-dead beauty with increase reneweth?
To you! to you! all song of praise is due:
Only at you, all envy hopeless rueth.
 
Who hath the hair, which loosest fastest tieth?        25
Who makes a man live, then glad when he dieth?
To you! to you! all song of praise is due:
Only of you, the flatterer never lieth.
 
Who hath the voice, which soul from senses sunders?
Whose force but yours the bolts of beauty thunders?        30
To you! to you! all song of praise is due:
Only with you, not miracles are wonders.
 
Doubt you to whom my Muse these notes intendeth,
Which now my breast o’ercharged to music lendeth?
To you! to you! all song of praise is due:        35
Only in you, my song begins and endeth.
 
Note 1. This first song in Astrophel and Stella is given with but few variants with the text of the 1598 and 1613 Arcadia. I have preferred to retain this reading in preference to Dr. Grosart’s (Complete Works, 3 vols., 1877), who reads in line 2, “surcharged,” for o’ercharged; and in line 17, “patience” for passions. [back]
 
 
CONTENTS · GLOSSARY · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
  PREVIOUSNEXT  
 
Loading
Click here to shop the Bartleby Bookstore.

Shakespeare · Bible · Strunk · Anatomy · Nonfiction · Quotations · Reference · Fiction · Poetry
© 1993–2014 Bartleby.com · [Top 150] · Subjects · Titles · Authors