Verse > Anthologies > William Stanley Braithwaite, ed. > The Book of Elizabethan Verse
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William Stanley Braithwaite, ed.  The Book of Elizabethan Verse.  1907.
 
Spring
By Thomas Nashe (1567–1601)
 
SPRING, 1 the sweet Spring, is the year’s pleasant king;
Then blooms each thing, then maids dance in a ring,
Cold doth not sting, the pretty birds do sing—
    Cuckoo, jug-jug, pu-we, to-witta-woo!
 
The palm and May 2 make country houses gay,        5
Lambs frisk and play, the shepherds pipe all day,
And we hear aye birds tune this merry lay—
    Cuckoo, jug-jug, pu-we, to-witta-woo!
 
The fields breathe sweet, the daisies kiss our feet,
Young lovers meet, old wives a-sunning sit,        10
In every street these tunes our ears do greet—
    Cuckoo, jug-jug, pu-we, to-witta-woo!
        Spring, the sweet Spring!
 
Note 1. From Summer’s Last Will and Testament, 1600. [back]
Note 2. The palm and May, etc. See note to Herrick’s Corinna’s Maying for this old custom of May Day. [back]
 
 
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