Verse > Anthologies > Harriet Monroe, ed. > Poetry: A Magazine of Verse, 1912–22
  PREVIOUSNEXT  
CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
Harriet Monroe, ed. (1860–1936).  Poetry: A Magazine of Verse.  1912–22.
 
The Old Gods
By Calvin Dill Wilson
 
THE OLD GODS never die,
They only watch and wait;
They wait for a thousand years
Beside the tall church gate.
 
Jove and Neptune and Mars,        5
Tyr and Odin and Thor,
These watch with the ageless stars,
They watch forevermore.
 
They call with the worn bronze trumpets,
They call and all men hear.        10
Their voice is deeper than church bells,
Deeper than chimes rung clear.
It charms like the seraphim’s,
And is older than all the hymns.
 
We hear the tramp of many feet        15
Upon the ancient pavements of the Gods.
We see the people hasten from the street,
Chanting their lauds.
Their fashion’s garments off they cast
And don the shag-skins of the past.        20
 
The Old Gods rule the seas,
And men are fed to the waves.
The Old Gods burn the cities;
They bind and ravish their slaves.
 
They ride on the storm and the lightning,        25
They revel in jungle and brake,
They inhabit the seats of the thunders
When the tempests in wrath awake.
 
A strange, strange smile
Is the Old Gods’, while        30
They hope for the Cross to fall
And they be lords of all.
 
Jove and Neptune and Mars,
Tyr and Odin and Thor,
These watch with the ageless stars,        35
They watch forevermore.
 
The Old Gods never die,
They only watch and wait,
They wait for a thousand years
Beside the tall church gate.        40
 
 
CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
  PREVIOUSNEXT  
 
Loading
Click here to shop the Bartleby Bookstore.

Shakespeare · Bible · Strunk · Anatomy · Nonfiction · Quotations · Reference · Fiction · Poetry
© 1993–2014 Bartleby.com · [Top 150] · Subjects · Titles · Authors