Verse > Anthologies > Alfred H. Miles, ed. > The Sacred Poets of the Nineteenth Century
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Alfred H. Miles, ed.  The Sacred Poets of the Nineteenth Century.  1907.
 
The Holy Year (1862).
IV. “O Day of rest and gladness”
By Christopher Wordsworth (1807–1885)
 
(Sunday)

O DAY of rest and gladness,
  O Day of joy and light,
O balm of care and sadness,
  Most beautiful, most bright!
On thee, the high, and lowly,        5
  Through ages join’d in tune,
Sing, Holy, Holy, Holy,
  To the great God Triune.
 
On thee, at the Creation,
  The Light first had its birth;        10
On thee, for our salvation,
  Christ rose from depths of earth;
On thee, our Lord victorious
  The Spirit sent from Heaven;
And thus on thee most glorious        15
  A triple Light was given.
 
Thou art a port protected
  From storms that round us rise;
A garden intersected
  With streams of Paradise;        20
Thou art a cooling fountain
  In life’s dry, dreary sand;
From thee, like Pisgah’s mountain,
  We view our Promised Land.
 
Thou art a holy ladder,        25
  Where Angels go and come;
Each Sunday finds us gladder,
  Nearer to Heaven, our home;
A day of sweet refection,
  A day thou art of love;        30
A day of Resurrection
  From earth to things above.
 
To-day on weary nations
  The heavenly Manna falls;
To holy convocations        35
  The silver trumpet calls,
Where Gospel-light is glowing
  With pure and radiant beams;
And living water flowing
  With soul-refreshing streams.        40
 
New graces ever gaining
  From this our day of rest,
We reach the Rest remaining
  To spirits of the blest;
To Holy Ghost be praises,        45
  To Father and to Son;
The Church her voice upraises
  To Thee, blest Three in One.
 
 
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