Verse > Anthologies > J. C. Squire, ed. > A Book of Women’s Verse
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J. C. Squire, ed.  A Book of Women’s Verse.  1921.
 
Love’s First Approach
By ‘Ephelia’ (17th Cent.?)
 
STREPHON I saw, and started at the sight,
And interchangeably looked red and white;
I felt my blood run swiftly to my heart,
And a chill trembling seize each outward part:
My breath grew short, my pulse did quicker beat,        5
My heart did heave, as it would change its seat:
A faint cold sweat o’er all my body spread,
A giddy megrim wheel’d about my head:
When for the reason of this change I sought,
I found my eyes had all the mischief wrought;        10
For they my sort to Strephon had betray’d,
And my weak heart his willing victim made:
The traitors, conscious of the treason
They had committed ’gainst my reason,
Looked down with such a bashful guilty fear,        15
As made their fault to every eye appear.
Though the first fatal look too much had done,
The lawless wanderers would still gaze on,
Kind looks repeat, and glances steal, till they
Had looked my liberty and heart away:        20
Great Love, I yield; send no more darts in vain,
I am already fond of my soft chain;
Proud of my fetters, so pleased with my state,
That I the very thought of Freedom hate.
O mighty Love! thy art and power join,        25
To make his frozen breast as warm as mine;
But if thou try’st, and canst not make him kind,
In Love such pleasant, real sweets I find,
That, though attended with despair it be,
’Tis better still than a wild liberty.        30
 
 
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