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Sigmund Freud (1856–1939).  Totem and Taboo.  1918.
 
Translator’s Introduction
 
WHEN one reviews the history of psychoanalysis 1 one finds that it had its inception in the study of morbid mental states. Beginning with the observation of hysteria and the other neuroses 2 Professor Freud gradually extended his investigations to normal psychology and evolved new concepts and new methods of study. The neurotic symptoms were no longer imaginary troubles the nature of which one could not grasp, but were conceived as mental and emotional maladjustments to one’s environment. The stamp of degeneracy impressed upon neurotics by other schools of medicine was altogether eradicated. Deeper investigation showed conclusively that a person might become neurotic if subjected to certain environments, and that there was no definite dividing line between normal and abnormal. The hysterical symptoms, obsessions, doubts, phobias, as well as hallucinations of the insane, show the same mechanisms as those similar psychic structures which one constantly encounters in normal persons in the form of mistakes in talking, reading, writing, forgetting, 3 dreams and wit. The dream, always highly valued by the populace, and as much despised by the educated classes, has a definite structure and meaning when subjected to analysis. Professor Freud’s monumental work, The Interpretation of Dreams, 4 marked a new epoch in the history of mental science. One might use the same words in reference to his profound analysis of wit. 5  1
  Faulty psychic actions, dreams and wit are products of the unconscious mental activity, and like neurotic or psychotic manifestations represent efforts at adjustment to one’s environment. The slip of the tongue shows that on account of unconscious inhibitions the individual concerned is unable to express his true thoughts; the dream is a distorted or plain expression of those wishes which are prohibited in the waking states, and the witticism, owing to its veiled or indirect way of expression, enables the individual to obtain pleasure from forbidden sources. But whereas dreams, witticisms, and faulty actions give evidences of inner conflicts which the individual overcomes, the neurotic or psychotic symptom is the result of a failure and represents a morbid adjustment.  2
  The aforementioned psychic formations are therefore nothing but manifestations of the struggle with reality, the constant effort to adjust one’s primitive feelings to the demands of civilization. In spite of all later development the individual retains all his infantile psychic structures. Nothing is lost; the infantile wishes and primitive impulses can always be demonstrated in the grown up and on occasion can be brought back to the surface. In his dreams the normal person is constantly reviving his childhood, and the neurotic or psychotic individual merges back into a sort of psychic infantilism through his morbid productions. The unconscious mental activity which is made up of repressed infantile material forever strives to express itself. Whenever the individual finds it impossible to dominate the difficulties of the world of reality there is a regression to the infantile, and psychic disturbances ensue which are conceived as peculiar thoughts and acts. Thus the civilized adult is the result of his childhood or the sum total of his early impressions; psychoanalysis thus confirms the old saying: The child is father to the man.  3
  It is at this point in the development of psychoanalysis that the paths gradually broadened until they finally culminated in this work. There were many indications that the childhood of the individual showed a marked resemblance to the primitive history or the childhood of races. The knowledge gained from dream analysis and phantasies, 6 when applied to the productions of racial phantasies, like myths and fairy tales, seemed to indicate that the first impulse to form myths was due to the same emotional strivings which produced dreams, fancies and symptoms. 7 Further study in this direction has thrown much light on our great cultural institutions, such as religion, morality, law and philosophy, all of which Professor Freud has modestly formulated in this volume and thus initiated a new epoch in the study of racial psychology.  4
  I take great pleasure in acknowledging my indebtedness to Mr. Alfred B. Kuttner for the invaluable assistance he rendered in the translation of this work.
A. A. BRILL.    
  5
 
Note 1. “The History of the Psychoanalytic Movement,” translated by A. A. Brill. Nervous and Mental Disease Monograph Series. [back]
Note 2. “Selected Papers on Hysteria and Other Psychoneuroses,” translated by A. A. Brill. Monograph Series. [back]
Note 3. “The Psychopathology of Everyday Life,” translated by A. A. Brill. T. Fisher Unwin, London, and the Macmillan Co., N. Y. [back]
Note 4. Translated by A. A. Brill, George Allen, and Unwin, London, and the Macmillan Co., N. Y. [back]
Note 5. “Wit and Its Relations to the Unconscious,” translated by A. A. Brill. Moffat, Yard and Co., N. Y. [back]
Note 6. Freud: “Leonardo Da Vinci,” translated by A. A. Brill. Moffat, Yard and Co., N. Y. [back]
Note 7. Cf. the works of Abraham, Spielrein, Jung, and Rank. [back]
 
 
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