Verse > Anthologies > William Stanley Braithwaite, ed. > Anthology of Massachusetts Poets
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CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
William Stanley Braithwaite, ed. (1878–1962).  Anthology of Massachusetts Poets.  1922.
 
Frimaire
 
Amy Lowell (1874–1925)
 
 
DEAREST, we are like two flowers
Blooming in the garden,
A purple aster flower and a red one
Standing alone in a withered desolation.
 
The garden plants are shattered and seeded,        5
One brittle leaf scrapes against another,
Fiddling echoes of a rush of petals.
Now only you and I nodding together.
 
Many were with us; they have all faded.
Only we are purple and crimson,        10
Only we in the dew-clear mornings,
Smarten into color as the sun rises.
 
When I scarcely see you in the flat moonlight,
And later when my cold roots tighten,
I am anxious for morning,        15
I cannot rest in fear of what may happen.
 
You or I—and I am a coward.
Surely frost should take the crimson.
Purple is a finer color,
Very splendid in isolation.        20
 
So we nod above the broken
Stems of flowers almost rotted.
Many mornings there cannot be now
For us both. Ah, Dear, I love you!
 

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