Verse > Anthologies > Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, ed. > Poems of Places > France
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Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, ed.  Poems of Places: An Anthology in 31 Volumes.
France: Vols. IX–X.  1876–79.
 
Castèl-Cuillè
The Blind Girl of Castèl Cuillè
Jacques Jasmin (1798–1864)
 
(See full text.)
Translated by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

    AT the foot of the mountain height
    Where is perched Castèl-Cuillè,
When the apple, the plum, and the almond tree
    In the plain below were growing white,
    This is the song one might perceive        5
On a Wednesday morn of Saint Joseph’s Eve:
 
“The roads should blossom, the roads should bloom,
So fair a bride shall leave her home!
Should blossom and bloom with garlands gay,
So fair a bride shall pass to-day!”        10
 
This old Te Deum, rustic rites attending,
    Seemed from the clouds descending;
    When lo! a merry company
Of rosy village girls, clean as the eye,
    Each one with her attendant swain,        15
Came to the cliff, all singing the same strain;
Resembling there, so near unto the sky,
Rejoicing angels, that kind Heaven has sent
For their delight and our encouragement.
        Together blending,        20
        And soon descending
        The narrow sweep
        Of the hillside steep,
        They wind aslant
        Towards Saint Amant,        25
        Through leafy alleys
        Of verdurous valleys
        With merry sallies
        Singing their chant:
 
“The roads should blossom, the roads should bloom,        30
So fair a bride shall leave her home!
Should blossom and bloom with garlands gay,
So fair a bride shall pass to-day!”
 
 
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