Verse > Anthologies > Harriet Monroe, ed. > The New Poetry: An Anthology
  PREVIOUS NEXT  
CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
Harriet Monroe, ed. (1860–1936).  The New Poetry: An Anthology.  1917.
 
306. The Growth of Lorraine
 
By Edwin Arlington Robinson
 
 
I
WHILE I stood listening, discreetly dumb,
Lorraine was having the last word with me:
“I know,” she said, “I know it, but you see
Some creatures are born fortunate, and some
Are born to be found out and overcome—        5
Born to be slaves, to let the rest go free;
And if I’m one of them (and I must be)
You may as well forget me and go home.
 
“You tell me not to say these things, I know,
But I should never try to be content:        10
I’ve gone too far; the life would be too slow.
Some could have done it—some girls have the stuff;
But I can’t do it—I don’t know enough.
I’m going to the devil.” And she went.
 
II
I did not half believe her when she said
        15
That I should never hear from her again;
Nor when I found a letter from Lorraine,
Was I surprised or grieved at what I read:
“Dear friend, when you find this, I shall be dead.
You are too far away to make me stop.        20
They say that one drop—think of it, one drop!—
Will be enough; but I’ll take five instead.
 
“You do not frown because I call you friend;
For I would have you glad that I still keep
Your memory, and even at the end—        25
Impenitent, sick, shattered—cannot curse
The love that flings, for better or for worse,
This worn-out, cast-out flesh of mine to sleep.”
 

CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
  PREVIOUS NEXT  
 
Loading
Click here to shop the Bartleby Bookstore.

Shakespeare · Bible · Strunk · Anatomy · Nonfiction · Quotations · Reference · Fiction · Poetry
© 1993–2014 Bartleby.com · [Top 150] · Subjects · Titles · Authors