Verse > Anthologies > Edward Farr, comp. > Elizabethan Poetry
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Edward Farr, ed.  Select Poetry of the Reign of Queen Elizabeth.  1845.
 
Embleme I
XVI. Geffrey Whitney
 
Motto: Te stante virebo.

A MIGHTIE 1 spyre, whose toppe dothe pierce the skie,
An iuie greene imbraceth rounde about;
And while it standes, the same doth bloom on highe,
But when it shrinkes, the iuie standes in dowt.
  The piller great our gratious princes is;        5
  The braunche the churche, whoe speakes vnto hir this:
 
“I that of late with stormes was almoste spent,
And brused sore with tirants’ bluddie bloes,
Whome fire and sworde with persecution rent,
Am nowe sett free, and ouerlooke my foes:        10
  And whiles thou raignst, oh most renowmed queene!
  By thie supporte my blossome shall be greene.”
 
Note 1. XVI. Geffrey Whitney.—He wrote “A choice of Emblemes, and other Devises, for the moste parte gathered out of sundrie writers, Englished and moralized, and divers newly devised. A worke adorned with varietie of matter, both pleasant and profitable: wherein those that please maye finde to fit their fancies: Bicause herein by the office of the eie, and the eare, the minde may reape dooble delight throughe holesome preceptes, shadowed with pleasand deuises: both fit for the vertuous, to their incoraging; and for the wicked, for their admonishing.” From one of the emblems in this volume, which was printed at Leyden in 1586, it appears that the author was a native of Cheshire, it being inscribed, “To my countrimen of the Namptwiche in Cheshire;” the wood-cut of which represents a phœnix rising from the flames, and the lines underneath allude to the rebuilding of Namptwiche after a dreadful fire which consumed a great part of it in 1593. Each emblem is illustrated by a wood-cut. Thus the emblem, having for its motto Super est quod supra est, which is here reprinted, has a print representing a pilgrim leaving the world (a geographical globe) behind, and travelling towards the symbol of the divine name in glory at the opposite extremity of the scene. [back]
 
 
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