Fiction > Harvard Classics > Molière > Tartuffe
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Jean Baptiste Poquelin Molière (1622–1673).  Tartuffe.
The Harvard Classics.  1909–14.
 
Act I
 
Scene V
 
 
ORGON,  CLÉANTE,  DORINE

Orgon

        Ah! Good morning, brother.
 
Cléante

I was just going, but am glad to greet you.
Things are not far advanced yet, in the country?
 
Orgon

Dorine…
 
(To CLÉANTE)

        Just wait a bit, please, brother-in-law.
        5
Let me allay my first anxiety
By asking news about the family.
 
(To DORINE)

Has everything gone well these last two days?
What’s happening? And how is everybody?
 
Dorine

Madam had fever, and a splitting headache
        10
Day before yesterday, all day and evening.
 
Orgon

And how about Tartuffe?
 
Dorine

        Tartuffe? He’s well;
He’s mighty well; stout, fat, fair, rosy-lipped.
 
Orgon

Poor man!
        15
 
Dorine

        At evening she had nausea
And could’t touch a single thing for supper,
Her headache still was so severe.
 
Orgon

        And how
About Tartuffe?        20
 
Dorine

        He supped alone, before her,
And unctuously ate up two partridges,
As well as half a leg o’ mutton, deviled.
 
Orgon

Poor man!
 
Dorine

        All night she couldn’t get a wink
        25
Of sleep, the fever racked her so; and we
Had to sit up with her till daylight.
 
Orgon

        How
About Tartuffe?
 
Dorine

        Gently inclined to slumber,
        30
He left the table, went into his room,
Got himself straight into a good warm bed,
And slept quite undisturbed until next morning.
 
Orgon

Poor man!
 
Dorine

        At last she let us all persuade her,
        35
And got up courage to be bled; and then
She was relieved at once.
 
Orgon

        And how about
Tartuffe?
 
Dorine

        He plucked up courage properly,
        40
Bravely entrenched his soul against all evils,
And to replace the blood that she had lost,
He drank at breakfast four huge draughts of wine.
 
Orgon

Poor man!
 
Dorine

So now they both are doing well;
        45
And I’ll go straightway and inform my mistress
How pleased you are at her recovery.
 

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