Fiction > Harvard Classics > Jean Racine > Phædra
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Jean Racine (1639–1699).  Phædra.
The Harvard Classics.  1909–14.
 
Act II
 
Scene VI
 
 
HIPPOLYTUS,  THERAMENES

Theramenes

Is that the form of Phædra that I see
Hurried away? What mean these signs of sorrow?
Where is your sword? Why are you pale, confused?
 
Hippolytus

Friend, let us fly. I am, indeed, confounded
With horror and astonishment extreme.        5
Phædra—but no; gods, let this dreadful secret
Remain for ever buried in oblivion.
 
Theramenes

The ship is ready if you wish to sail.
But Athens has already giv’n her vote;
Their leaders have consulted all her tribes;        10
Your brother is elected, Phædra wins.
 
Hippolytus

Phædra?
 
Theramenes

        A herald, charged with a commission
From Athens, has arrived to place the reins
Of power in her hands. Her son is King.        15
 
Hippolytus

Ye gods, who know her, do ye thus reward
Her virtue?
 
Theramenes

        A faint rumour meanwhile whispers
That Theseus is not dead, but in Epirus
Has shown himself. But, after all my search,        20
I know too well—
 
Hippolytus

        Let nothing be neglected.
This rumour must be traced back to its source.
If it be found unworthy of belief,
Let us set sail, and cost whate’er it may,        25
To hands deserving trust the sceptre’s sway.
 

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