Verse > Anthologies > Walter Murdoch, comp. > The Oxford Book of Australasian Verse
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Walter Murdoch (1874–1970).  The Oxford Book of Australasian Verse.  1918.
 
35. Hast thou forgotten me?
 
By Philip Joseph Holdsworth
 
 
HAST thou forgotten me? the days are dark—
  Light ebbs from heaven, and songless soars the lark—
Vexed like my heart, loud moans the unquiet sea—
  Hast thou forgotten me?
 
Hast thou forgotten me? O dead delight        5
Whose dreams and memories torture me to-night—
O love—my life! O sweet—so fair to see—
  Hast thou forgotten me?
 
Hast thou forgotten? Lo, if one should say—
Noontide were night, or night were flaming day—        10
Grief blinds mine eyes, I know not which it be!
  Hast thou forgotten me?
 
Hast thou forgotten? Ah, if Death should come,
Close my sad eyes, and charm my song-bird dumb—
Tired of strange woes—my fate were hailed with glee—        15
  Hast thou forgotten me?
 
Hast thou forgotten me? What joy have I?
A dim blown bird beneath an alien sky,—
O that on mighty pinions I could flee—
  Hast thou forgotten me?        20
 
Hast thou forgotten? Yea, Love’s horoscope
Is blurred with tears and suffering beyond Hope—
Ah, like dead leaves forsaken of the tree,
  Thou hast forgotten me.
 

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