Verse > Anthologies > Edmund Clarence Stedman, ed. > An American Anthology, 1787–1900
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Edmund Clarence Stedman, ed. (1833–1908).  An American Anthology, 1787–1900.  1900.
 
539. Adonais
 
By Will Wallace Harney
 
 
SHALL we meet no more, my love, at the binding of the sheaves,
  In the happy harvest-fields, as the sun sinks low,
When the orchard paths are dim with the drift of fallen leaves,
And the reapers sing together, in the mellow, misty eves:
  O, happy are the apples when the south winds blow!        5
 
Love met us in the orchard, ere the corn had gathered plume,—
  O, happy are the apples when the south winds blow!
Sweet as summer days that die when the months are in the bloom,
And the peaks are ripe with sunset, like the tassels of the broom,
  In the happy harvest-fields as the sun sinks low.        10
 
Sweet as summer days that die, leafing sweeter each to each,—
  O, happy are the apples when the south winds blow!
All the heart was full of feeling: love had ripened into speech,
Like the sap that turns to nectar in the velvet of the peach,
  In the happy harvest-fields as the sun sinks low.        15
 
Sweet as summer days that die at the ripening of the corn,—
  O, happy are the apples when the south winds blow!
Sweet as lovers’ fickle oaths, sworn to faithless maids forsworn,
When the musty orchard breathes like a mellow drinking-horn,
  Over happy harvest-fields as the sun sinks low.        20
 
Love left us at the dying of the mellow autumn eves,—
  O, happy are the apples when the south winds blow!
When the skies are ripe and fading, like the colors of the leaves,
And the reapers kiss and part, at the binding of the sheaves,
  In the happy harvest-fields as the sun sinks low.        25
 
Then the reapers gather home, from the gray and misty meres;—
  O, happy are the apples when the south winds blow!
Then the reapers gather home, and they bear upon their spears,
One whose face is like the moon, fallen gray among the spheres,
  With the daylight’s curse upon it, as the sun sinks low.        30
 
Faint as far-off bugles blowing, soft and low the reapers sung;—
  O, happy are the apples when the south winds blow!
Sweet as summer in the blood, when the heart is ripe and young,
Love is sweetest in the dying, like the sheaves he lies among,
  In the happy harvest-fields as the sun sinks low.        35
 

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