Verse > Anthologies > Edmund Clarence Stedman, ed. > An American Anthology, 1787–1900
  PREVIOUS NEXT  
CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
Edmund Clarence Stedman, ed. (1833–1908).  An American Anthology, 1787–1900.  1900.
 
1701. Moritura
 
By Margaret Gilman (George) Davidson
 
 
I AM the mown grass, dying at your feet,
  The pale grass, gasping faintly in the sun.
  I shall be dead, long, long ere day is done,
That you may say: “The air, to-day, was sweet.”
I am the mown grass, dying at your feet.        5
 
I am the white syringa, falling now,
When some one shakes the bough.
  What matter if I lose my life’s brief noon?
  You laugh, “A snow in June!”
I am the white syringa, falling now.        10
 
I am the waning lamp that flickers on,—
  Trying to give my old, unclouded light
  Among the rest that make your garden bright.
Let me still burn till all my oil is gone.
I am the waning lamp that flickers on.        15
 
I am your singer, singing my last note.
Death’s fingers clutch my throat.
  New grass will grow, new flowers bloom and fall;
  New lamps blaze out against your garden wall:
I am your singer, singing my last note.        20
 

CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
  PREVIOUS NEXT  
 
Loading
Click here to shop the Bartleby Bookstore.

Shakespeare · Bible · Strunk · Anatomy · Nonfiction · Quotations · Reference · Fiction · Poetry
© 1993–2014 Bartleby.com · [Top 150] · Subjects · Titles · Authors