Verse > Anthologies > Edmund Clarence Stedman, ed. > A Victorian Anthology, 1837–1895
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Edmund Clarence Stedman, ed. (1833–1908).  A Victorian Anthology, 1837–1895.  1895.
 
Ite Domum Saturæ, Venit Hesperus
 
Arthur Hugh Clough (1819–61)
 
 
THE SKIES have sunk, and hid the upper snow,
(Home, Rose, and home, Provence and La Palie!)
The rainy clouds are filling fast below,
And wet will be the path, and wet shall we.
Home, Rose, and home, Provence and La Palie!        5
 
Ah dear! and where is he, a year agone,
Who stepp’d beside and cheer’d us on and on?
My sweetheart wanders far away from me
In foreign land or on a foreign sea.
Home, Rose, and home, Provence and La Palie!        10
 
The lightning zigzags shoot across the sky,
(Home, Rose, and home, Provence and La Palie!)
And through the vale the rains go sweeping by;
Ah me! and when in shelter shall we be?
(Home, Rose, and home, Provence and La Palie!)        15
 
Cold, dreary cold, the stormy winds feel they
O’er foreign lands and foreign seas that stray.
(Home, Rose, and home, Provence and La Palie!)
And doth he e’er, I wonder bring to mind
The pleasant huts and herds the left behind?        20
 
And doth he sometimes in his slumbering see
The feeding kine, and doth he think of me,
My sweetheart wandering wheresoe’er it be?
Home, Rose, and home, Provence and La Palie!
 
The thunder bellows far from snow to snow,        25
(Home, Rose, and home, Provence and La Palie!)
And loud and louder roars the flood below.
Heigh-ho! but soon in shelter shall we be:
Home, Rose, and home, Provence and La Palie!
 
Or shall he find before his term be sped        30
Some comelier maid that he shall wish to wed?
(Home, Rose, and home, Provence and La Palie!)
For weary is work, and weary day by day
To have your comfort miles on miles away.
(Home, Rose, and home, Provence and La Palie!)        35
 
Or may it be that I shall find my mate,
And he, returning, see himself too late?
For work we must, and what we see, we see,
And God he knows, and what must be, must be,
When sweethearts wander far away from me.        40
Home, Rose, and home, Provence and La Palie!
 
The sky behind is brightening up anew,
(Home, Rose, and home, Provence and La Palie!)
The rain is ending, and our journey too;
Heigh-ho! aha! for here at home are we:—        45
In, Rose, and in, Provence and La Palie!
 

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