Verse > Anthologies > Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. > The Oxford Book of Ballads
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Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (1863–1944).  The Oxford Book of Ballads.  1910.
 
133. John Dory
 
 
I

AS it fell on a holy-day,
  And upon a holy-tide-a,
John Dory bought him an ambling nag,
  To Paris for to ride-a.
 
II

And when John Dory to Paris was come,
        5
  A little before the gate-a,
John Dory was fitted, the porter was witted
  To let him in thereat-a.
 
III

The first man that John Dory did meet
  Was good King John of France-a;        10
John Dory could well of his courtesie,
  But fell downe in a trance-a.
 
IV

‘A pardon, a pardon, my liege and my king,
  For my merry men and for me-a,
And all the churls in merry England,        15
  I’le bring them all bound to thee-a.’
 
V

And Nichol was then a Cornish man,
  A little beside Bohyde-a,
He mann’d him forth a good black barke,
  With fifty good oars of a side-a.        20
 
VI

‘Run up, my boy, unto the maine top,
  And look what thou canst spy-a:’
‘Who ho! who ho! a good ship I do see,
  I trow it be John Dory-a.’
 
VII

They hoist their sailes both top and top,
        25
  The mizzen and all was tride-a,
And every man stood to his lot,
  Whatever should betide-a.
 
VIII

The roring cannons then were plied,
  And dub-a-dub went the drum-a;        30
The braying trumpets loud they cried
  To courage both all and some-a.
 
IX

The grappling-hooks were brought at length,
  The brown bill and the sword-a,
John Dory at length, for all his strength,        35
  Was clapt fast under board-a.
 

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