Verse > Anthologies > Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. > The Oxford Book of Ballads
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CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (1863–1944).  The Oxford Book of Ballads.  1910.
 
131. The ‘George-Aloe’
 
 
I

THE George-Aloe, and the Sweepstake, too,
  With hey, with hoe, for and a nony no,
O, there were two Merchant-men, a sailing for Safee
  And alongst the Coast of Barbarye.
 
II

The George-Aloe came to anchor in the bay,
        5
  With hey, &c.
But the jolly Sweepstake kept on her way,
  And alongst, &c.
 
III

They had not sayl’d but leagues two or three,
  With hey, &c.        10
But they met with a French Man-of-War upon the Sea,
  And alongst, &c.
 
IV

‘All haile, all haile, you lusty Gallants all!
  With hey, &c.
Of whence is your fair Ship, and whither do ye call?’        15
  And alongst, &c.
 
V

‘We are Englishmen, and bound for Safee,’—
  With hey, &c.
‘Ay, and we are Frenchmen, and war upon the sea,
  And alongst, &c.        20
 
VI

‘Amaine, Amaine, you English dogs, hail!’—
  With hey, &c.
‘Come aboard you French swads, and strike down your sayle,’
  And alongst, &c.
 
VII

They laid us aboard on the Starboard side,
        25
  With hey, &c.
And they threw us into the Sea so wide,
  And alongst, &c.
 
VIII

When tidings to the George-Aloe came,
  With hey, &c.        30
That the jolly Sweepstake by a Frenchman was ta’en,
  And alongst, &c.
 
IX

‘To top, to top, thou little Cabin-boy,
  With hey, &c.
And see if this French Man-of-War thou canst descry,’—        35
  And alongst, &c.
 
X

‘A Sayle, a Sayle, under our lee!
  With hey, &c.
Yea, and another that is under her obey!’
  And alongst, &c.        40
 
XI

‘Weigh anchor, weigh anchor, O jolly Boat-swain!
  With hey, &c.
We will take this Frenchman, if we can,’
  And alongst, &c.
 
XII

We had not sayl’d leagues two or three,
        45
  With hey, &c.
But we met the French Man-of-War upon the Sea,
  And alongst, &c.
 
XIII

‘All haile, All haile, you lusty Gallants hail!
  With hey, &c.        50
Of whence is your faire Ship, and whither do ye sayl?’
  And alongst, &c.
 
XIV

‘O, we are Merchant-men and bound for Safee,’—
  With hey, &c.
‘Ay, and we are Frenchmen, and war upon the sea,        55
  And alongst, &c.
 
XV

‘Amaine, Amaine, you English Dogges, hail!’—
  With hey, &c.
‘Come aboard, you French rogues, and strike down your sayl!’
  And alongst, &c.        60
 
XVI

The first good shot that the George-Aloe shot,
  With hey, &c.
He made the Frenchman’s heart sore afraid,
  And alongst, &c.
 
XVII

The second shot the George-Aloe did afford,
        65
  With hey, &c.
He struck their main-mast over the board,
  And alongst, &c.
 
XVIII

‘Have mercy, have mercy, you brave English Men!’—
  With hey, &c.        70
‘O, what have you done with our merry Brethren?’—
  And alongst, &c.
 
XIX

‘We laid them aboard the starboard side,
  With hey, &c.
And we threw them into the Sea so wide,’—        75
  And alongst, &c.
 
XX

‘Such mercy as you have shewed unto them,
  With hey, &c.
Then the like mercy shall you have again,’—
  And alongst, &c.        80
 
XXI

We laid them aboard the larboard side,
  With hey, &c.
And we threw them into the Sea so wide,
  And alongst, &c.
 
XXII

Lord, how it grieved our hearts full Sore,
        85
With hey, &c.
To see the drowned Frenchmen to swim along the shore!
And alongst, &c.
 
XXIII

Now gallant Seamen I bid you all adieu,
With hey, &c.        90
This is the last Newes I can write to you,
To England’s Coast from Barbarye.
 
GLOSS:  shifted his room] made place.  swads] peascods, a cant term for soldiers.
 

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