Verse > Carl Sandburg > Smoke and Steel > V. Mist Forms > 33. Wind Song
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Carl Sandburg (1878–1967).  Smoke and Steel. 1922.
  
V. Mist Forms
33. Wind Song
  
LONG ago I learned how to sleep,
In an old apple orchard where the wind swept by counting its money and throwing it away,
In a wind-gaunt orchard where the limbs forked out and listened or never listened at all,
In a passel of trees where the branches trapped the wind into whistling, “Who, who are you?”
I slept with my head in an elbow on a summer afternoon and there I took a sleep lesson.        5
There I went away saying: I know why they sleep, I know how they trap the tricky winds.
Long ago I learned how to listen to the singing wind and how to forget and how to hear the deep whine,
Slapping and lapsing under the day blue and the night stars:
  Who, who are you?
  
Who can ever forget        10
listening to the wind go by
counting its money
and throwing it away?

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