Reference > Cambridge History > Later National Literature, Part II > The Drama, 1860–1918 > The Civil War on the Stage
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The Cambridge History of English and American Literature in 18 Volumes (1907–21).
VOLUME XVII. Later National Literature, Part II.

XVIII. The Drama, 1860–1918.

§ 1. The Civil War on the Stage.


FOR the ten years preceding the advent of Bronson Howard, the American drama settled upon staid and not very vigorous times. The Civil War was not conducive to original production at the time; and its influence was not great upon the character of the amusement in the American theatre. Only after many years had passed, and after local and national feeling had been allowed to cool, did the Civil War become a topic for the stage,—in such dramas as William Gillette’s Held by the Enemy (Madison Square Theatre, 16 August, 1886),  1  Shenandoah (Star Theatre, 9 September, 1889) by Bronson Howard, The Girl I Left Behind Me (Empire Theatre, 25 January, 1893) by David Belasco and Franklyn Fyles, The Heart of Maryland (Herald Square Theatre, 22 October, 1895) by David Belasco, William Gillette’s Secret Service (Garrick Theatre, 5 October, 1896), James A. Herne’s Griffith Davenport (Washington, Lafayette Square Theatre, 16 January, 1899), Barbara Frietchie (Criterion Theatre, 24 October, 1899) by Clyde Fitch.   1

Note 1. Unless it is otherwise stated, the theatres an dates given with the titles of plays apply to initial New York productions. [ back ]

CONTENTS · VOLUME CONTENTS · INDEX OF ALL CHAPTERS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
   Black and Red Americans  
 
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