Reference > Cambridge History > Early National Literature, Part II; Later National Literature, Part I > Magazines, Annuals, and Gift-books, 1783–1850 > South and West
  After the War of 1812 Types  

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The Cambridge History of English and American Literature in 18 Volumes (1907–21).
VOLUME XVI. Early National Literature, Part II; Later National Literature, Part I.

XX. Magazines, Annuals, and Gift-books, 1783–1850.

§ 7. South and West.


The return of peace soon brought another large crop of new periodicals. Boston, New York, and Philadelphia still led, of course, in the number of these ventures, but every town of literary pretensions tried to maintain a magazine. The South had its fair share; and in the region west of the Alleghanies there was a surprisingly large number. Cincinnati and Lexington were the most important publishing centres in this region, but several less famous towns in the Ohio Valley had their literary periodicals at an early date. By 1831 James Hall 5  was publishing The Illinois Monthly Magazine at Vandalia, and before 1850 Chicago and other cities in the central West had followed the prevailing fashion.   8

Note 5. See also Book II, Chap. VII. [ back ]

CONTENTS · VOLUME CONTENTS · INDEX OF ALL CHAPTERS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
  After the War of 1812 Types  
 
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