Reference > Cambridge History > The Victorian Age, Part Two > The Literature of Travel, 1700–1900 > A. H. Layard
  W. G. Palgrave Speke  

CONTENTS · VOLUME CONTENTS · INDEX OF ALL CHAPTERS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD

The Cambridge History of English and American Literature in 18 Volumes (1907–21).
Volume XIV. The Victorian Age, Part Two.

VII. The Literature of Travel, 1700–1900.

§ 15. A. H. Layard.


An eastern travel-book of equal interest though of quite a different stamp is A Popular account of discoveries at Nineveh (1851) by Austen Henry Layard, who, also, was a restlessly energetic eastern wanderer of cosmopolitan tastes and habits. More picturesque, even, than the description of the finding of the great sculptured man-lion is the account of the removal of the colossal man-bull by a crowd of yelling Arab workmen “half-frantic with excitement.” In his old age, after a varied diplomatic and parliamentary career, Sir Henry Layard wrote a charming account of Early Adventures in Persia, Susiana and Babylonia. Among literary works of eastern travel, William Hepworth Dixon’s two works on Palestine and on Cyprus also claim mention.   32

CONTENTS · VOLUME CONTENTS · INDEX OF ALL CHAPTERS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
  W. G. Palgrave Speke  
 
Loading
Click here to shop the Bartleby Bookstore.

Shakespeare · Bible · Strunk · Anatomy · Nonfiction · Quotations · Reference · Fiction · Poetry
© 1993–2014 Bartleby.com · [Top 150] · Subjects · Titles · Authors