Reference > Cambridge History > The Period of the French Revolution > Book Production and Distribution, 1625–1800 > Literary Coffee-houses
  Other Localities; Westminster Hall Payne, Davies  

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The Cambridge History of English and American Literature in 18 Volumes (1907–21).
Volume XI. The Period of the French Revolution.

XIV. Book Production and Distribution, 1625–1800.

§ 28. Literary Coffee-houses.


At this time, coffee-houses were a favourite resort for social and political gossip and the reading of the news. 30  In Guy Miege’s Present State of Great Britain, for 1707, it is remarked that
The Coffee-houses particularly are very commodious for a free Conversation, and for reading at an easie Rate all manner of printed News, the Votes of Parliament when sitting, and other Prints that come out Weekly or casually. Amongst which the London Gazette comes out on Mundays and Thursdays, the Daily Courant every day but Sunday, the Postman, Flying-Post, and Post-Boy, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, and the English Post, Mundays, Wednesdays, and Fridays; besides their frequent Postscripts.
  52

Note 30. Concerning coffee-houses as literary resorts, see ante, Vol. IX, pp. 34–42. [ back ]

CONTENTS · VOLUME CONTENTS · INDEX OF ALL CHAPTERS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
  Other Localities; Westminster Hall Payne, Davies  
 
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