Fiction > Harvard Classics > Homer > The Odyssey
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Homer (fl. 850 B.C.).  The Odyssey.
The Harvard Classics.  1909–14.
 
Concluding Sonnet
 
 
Homer, thy song men liken to the sea,
    With every note of music in his tone,
    With tides that wash the dim dominion
Of Hades, and light waves that laugh in glee
Around the isles enchanted: nay, to me        5
    Thy verse seems as the River of source unknown
    That glasses Egypt’s temples overthrown,
In his sky-nurtur’d stream, eternally.
No wiser we than men of heretofore
    To find thy mystic fountains guarded fast;        10
Enough—thy flood makes green our human shore
    As Nilus, Egypt, rolling down his vast,
His fertile waters, murmuring evermore
    Of gods dethroned, and empires of the Past.
A. L.
 

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